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Do you take the shortest route to add value?

Every thriving business adds value. If it didn’t it would not exist. Healthcare shares many points of difference with any other service but none is more remarkable than the  ability to forge connections via the physical examination. It meets our fundamental need when we are ill.

Treatment that uses direct touch can have a depth and potency that can have a great therapeutic impact, which provides some explanation for why so many people are seeking out their own “professional touchers” or are filling the waiting rooms of physicians, waiting for the doctor to find the cause of the pain and make them better. In the process, they are touched. When the patient is assured that the work of the professional toucher is free from infringement, that sexual contact is clearly out of bounds, and that the patient can say “no” to any intervention the body-work practitioner proposes, then the patient can have the experience of trust and physical touch in the context of a controlled respectful relationship. Sharon K Farber

If you are a healthcare professional in what proportion of cases don’t  you perform a physical exam? Why?

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Do you advise or dictate?

What do you advise most people who seek your help? What will solve most of their problems? It was interesting to read an article this week suggesting that junk food may be associated with depression. In her commentary Megan Lee notes:

Depression has long been treated with medication and talking therapies – and they’re not going anywhere just yet. But we’re beginning to understand that increasing how much exercise we get and switching to a healthy diet can also play an important role in treating – and even preventing – depression.

For many of the most coveted outcomes in healthcare three things are paramount:

  1. Eat less
  2. Exercise more
  3. Don’t smoke

Simple focus. Not easily translated in practice because selling a healthy lifestyle is tricky:

Interviews with 130 mothers of lower social class provided the basis for studying their views on the desirability of general practitioner intervention in their lifestyle habits; the study used both quantitative (questionnaire) and qualitative (interview) techniques. The majority of women were in favour of counselling on specific topics by the general practitioner but the qualitative data also revealed that most respondents expected the issues to be relevant to their presenting problem. Moreover they were keen to assert their right to accept or reject the advice given. Stott and Pill

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How do you prepare for disagreement?

Sometimes you might be asked for something that seems entirely pointless. In healthcare almost every speciality has examples of such challenging situations. In intensive care and oncology such issues are most poignant as patients may end up suffering before death:

In a retrospective review, we identified 100 patients of 331 bioethical consultations who had futile or medically inappropriate therapy. The average age of patients was 73.5 ± 32 years (mean ± 2 SD) with 57% being male. Fifty-seven percent of the patients were admitted to the hospital with a degenerative disorder, 21% with an inflammatory disorder, and 16% with a neoplastic disorder. The family was responsible for futile treatment in 62% of cases, the physician in 37% of cases, and a conservator in one case. Unreasonable expectation for improvement was the most common underlying factor. Family dissent was involved in 7 of 62 cases motivated by family, but never when physicians were primarily responsible. Liability issues motivated physicians in 12 of 37 cases where they were responsible but in only 1 of 62 cases when the family was (χ2 5 degrees of freedom = 26.7, p < 0.001).

Seth et al

This scenario may be avoided if it is anticipated as a ‘set play‘. List all the ways you may be adding to the person’s problems and consider how you might avoid contributing to a bad situation.

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Are you ready yet?

What do you do before you interact with your next customer, client or patient?

Gaze and body orientation communicate levels of engagement with and disengagement from courses of action. As doctors and patients accomplish regular tasks preparatory to dealing with patients’ chief complaints, doctors use gaze and body orientation to communicate that they are preparing but are not yet ready to deal with those complaints. In response, patients wait for their doctors to solicit their chief complaint. These findings have implications for research on nonverbal communication, interactional asymmetry, and power.

JD Robinson

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I am Joe and I get what I want

As I surveyed the new intake of medical students one student found his way to the front of the room.

Are you the associate dean?

When I confirmed he went on:

My name is Joe ( Not his real name- to spare his blushes). You need to know that I get what I want.

Now two years later here was Dr. Joe graduating, resplendent in his academic gown. He has his wish which I hope is for a lifetime of selfless service to people in distress. So when he is called to the patient in bed 9, on the wards tonight and he is told:

I’m Mr. Smith, and you need to know I get what I want. Tell your boss to come to my room at 11am, I’ll be ready for him then and by the way I’m not happy taking those pill, please take them away.

Joe will know he has got his wish.

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Are you credible as a lifestyle coach?

The commonest conditions doctors encounter are illnesses directly related to poor life style choices. Diseases that arise because we eat too much and don’t take enough exercise.

People who seek healthcare advice will be told more often than not that they must make different choices. How credible is your advice as a doctor? How persuasive are you as the messenger? How could you do this better?

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Are you sure you will focus on the right problem?

In any business where you are paid to solve problems you need to be clear that you are indeed solving the right problem. Doctors can frame the problem in many ways- if their patient has been brought in after a car accident then ‘the problem’ is  clearly the broken leg or the bleeding wound. What’s much less obvious is the problem that needs to be solved in all other circumstances.

In the moment you are sitting in front of the doctor the problem isn’t the runny nose, the headache, the sore throat or the anxiety. Being told it’s just a virus won’t help. You need that  doctor to give you their undivided attention and to see the context in which you are experiencing that discomfort. To acknowledge your distress. There is ‘no cure’ for a viral upper respiratory tract infection and you knew that before you walked into that office. Right?

Pcture by Luis Sarabia

Can the patient relay what was done for them?

A perennial source of dissatisfaction in healthcare (as documented here and here) is the poor flow of information from one sector to another. ‘Joe’ (speaking here– video from BMJ open) couldn’t tell me, his doctor, anything helpful about what had been done while he had been in hospital. That means we have to schedule several appointments to try to unpack it all. He was an in-patient for two weeks and someone had decided one Thursday morning that it was time for him to go home. It wasn’t really clear to Joe or to me why that particular morning or what was to happen when he got home other than that he should contact his ‘local GP’. A letter would follow some time in the future. There may have been good or bad reasons for sending him home. We could only guess what was in the mind of the person who made the decision:

We needed the bed. Joe was fine. His observations were normal, he was ambulant his wife was happy to take him home.

But of course Joe comes home with lots of questions, which I now struggle to answer without making phone calls to track down the busy medical team. The problem is articulated by several ‘stakeholders’ members of the ‘multidisciplinary team’ on the ward none of whom feel they own the problem of telling this man what he needs to know. There is only one constant in this story- Joe. If Joe can collect the information we need during the course of his hospital stay we might begin to improve the outcome:

In addition to increasing the burden on GPs, it engenders a need for a subsequent GP appointment; it limits GP capacity to respond to patient concerns and queries, at least on one occasion; it may result in a re-referral to the specialist; and it increases GP dissatisfaction with the care provided to the patient by the hospital. BMJ

The problem is Joe often does not know what he needs to know by the end of his hospital stay. It isn’t impossible to work out how to trigger questions for Joe to ask throughout his hospitalisation. What is far more difficult is to motivate every hospital ward and every discipline in a team to address this challenge consistently. It is ‘easier’ to nudge one individual than enlist the cooperation of the dozens of health professionals who will come into contact with Joe. Making people active in healthcare processes has achieved results before:

Influence at Work, a training and consultancy company that Cialdini founded, worked with the United Kingdom’s National Health Service (NHS) in a set of studies aimed at reducing the number of patients who fail to show up for medical appointments. They did this by simply making patients more involved in the appointment-making process, such as asking the patient to write down the details of the appointment themselves rather than simply receiving an appointment card. Sleek

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Change your reactions to change your results

In 2017 you can expect to be challenged because it is unlikely that everything will go to plan. As in everything in life you have a choice how to react but you may find it difficult to exercise that choice because of your habits. You can bear witness to these habits in your interactions at work next week. According to the Karpman drama triangle you are likely to be your own worst enemy.

When ‘bad things’ happen you may react in one of three ways initially:

Victim

‘Poor me!’

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One that is acted on and usually adversely affected by a force or agent

(1):  one that is injured, destroyed, or sacrificed under any of various conditions

(2):  one that is subjected to oppression, hardship, or mistreatment. Merriam Webster 

From the victim’s perspective it’s their fault. ‘They’ did it to you. It’s the government, the company, the patients, the clients, your  boss. If not them it’s the weather, the traffic, your genes. There is nothing you can do but complain.

Rescuer

‘Let me help you’ (and thus keep you dependent on me).

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A person who pretends to suffer or who exaggerates suffering in order to get praise or sympathy. Merriam Webster

From the rescuer’s (martyr’s) perspective they are surrounded by people who make unreasonable demands. Nobody can get the job done without their help. It may mean cancelling holidays and working weekends but there is nothing for it.

Persecutor

‘It’s all your fault.’

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 The Persecutor is controlling, blaming, critical, oppressive, angry, authoritative, rigid, and superior. Wikipedia

From this perspective it’s time to put your foot down. ‘Enough is enough’. ‘They’need to be brought into line.

It has been suggested that we move in and out of these roles. However everyone has a default position and in most cases it is the ‘rescuer’. This may be because:

It keeps the Victim dependent and gives the Victim permission to fail. The rewards derived from this rescue role are that the focus is taken off of the rescuer. When he/she focuses their energy on someone else, it enables them to ignore their own anxiety and issues. This rescue role is also very pivotal because their actual primary interest is really an avoidance of their own problems disguised as concern for the victim’s needs. Karpman Drama Triangle.

At this time as we launch on another round of New Year’s resolutions. Our results may already be predicted.

  1. How many times over the past week, while you were allegedly on holiday,  have you responded to email or taken phone calls for work?
  2. How many times have you felt compelled to work even though you were on ‘holiday’?
  3. In how many conversations over dinner have you moaned about your job?
  4. What will be the first topic of conversation at work after the polite “How was your Christmas”?

The antithesis of a drama triangle lies in discovering how to deprive the actors of their payoff. Therefore if your default position is ‘rescuer’ you may want to consider whether, or perhaps which, of your own problems you are avoiding. Keep a close eye on your behaviour next week. That may be a better place to start making meaningful resolutions this year. For best results also consider reading: The Coaching Habit by Michael Bungay Stanier. You may also enjoy in praise of the quiet life.

Picture by Brandon Warren

Create your own working conditions or deal with the headaches

It was Friday morning. S/he looked well so I was surprised when s/he said:

I woke up with a headache this morning. I’ve taken paracetamol. I feel a bit better but I couldn’t go to work this morning.

What do you do for a living? I asked. Insert into his /her response:

Teacher/nurse/social worker/call centre operator/forklift driver

Is it busy just now? I asked. Wondering how his/ her boss would take the news of this absence. The smile slipped.

It’s been terrible this year. Lots of demanding (patients/ clients/ kids/shifts).

Then- tears.

I’ve got to hold it together. I’m only six months away from ( holiday/ long service leave/ wedding/ boss leaving)

Is this sustainable? Really?

How much time do you spend on things that are either distractions (not-urgent or important) or someone else’s emergency (urgent /not important)? How much time do you spend on the most valuable quadrant not urgent and important? Why are you always fire fighting (urgent and important) ? Icon made by Ocha from www.flaticon.com

What are you doing during the most productive time of the day? What do you focus on first in the morning? When you are fresh and rested? What are you leaving till later when you should be heading home? Icon made by Freepik from www.flaticon.com

 

It’s your responsibility to set limits to your accessibility. If your boss wants you to do this then s/he doesn’t expect you to do the other.  Are you sure you clarified the situation? YOU have created these unreasonable expectations because the word ‘no’ isn’t in your vocabulary. Icon made by Freepik from www.flaticon.com

 

Finally how much energy, stamina, good will or creativity is left in the tank? There is a limit- even for you. Icon made by Freepik from www.flaticon.com

You are not exempt even if you are a doctor. If you don’t create the life you want then one will be created for you. And it might just give you a headache. You have some thinking to do while you nurse that headache.

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