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What do you do that you could stop?

We often do things out of habit rather than for a good reason. As healthcare professionals that might be poor. Ordering tests because it’s something we always do ‘ in these circumstances’ might lead to  problems- specifically false positive and false negative results. When that happens it doesn’t just buy time while we think of a diagnosis it also potentially creates a false diagnosis. What if you were a doctor and were held to account for every false diagnosis you made?

Picture by Jessica Quinn

Do you prepare to disappoint?

In any business there will be time when you don’t see eye to eye with your customer.  In fact there will be times when you disagree with them because what they want is either impossible, illegal, unavailable or otherwise difficult for you to deliver.

You might encounter that situation more than once in the course of your day. You expect it right? So if you are a doctor how do you prepare to deliver that news to a patient?

Once you’ve dumped your baggage and assumptions, approached patients with humanity and compassion, and discovered the real problem, what’s your next step? That depends upon what the real problem you discovered is. Is the problem something that is your fault or one you can solve? Did the patient have expectations that weren’t correct? Have an honest and forthright discussion with them. If you can do that, you’ll be getting thank you cards from your patients for a very long time. David J. Norris, MD

Picture by LenaLandmine

Are you persuasive?

If your job involves advising- are you a credible source of advice? How do you know?  What can you do to make yourself a more influential? Apart from giving credible advice is there something you can do to make your advice more likely to persuade?

There’s a critical insight in all this for those of us who want to learn to be more influential. The best persuaders become the best through pre-suasion – the process of arranging for recipients to be receptive to a message before they encounter it. To persuade optimally, then, it’s necessary to pre-suade optimally. But how?

In part, the answer involves an essential but poorly appreciated tenet of all communication: what we present first changes the way people experience what we present to them next.
Robert B. Cialdini, Pre-Suasion: A Revolutionary Way to Influence and Persuade

Picture by  Cabinet Office

 

What do people see on your desk?

Okay so you might not have chosen the wall paper, the carpet or the size of your office but what’s on display on your desk? What impression is created at a glance? Do you look organised? Do you look like you’ve got the time to give your visitors some attention?

There are six reasons to clean off your desk and as Catherine Conlan suggests:

Remember, your workspace speaks for you even when you’re not there.

Picture by Andrew Tarvin

What’s your vibe?

Do the people who seek your help sense that you are distinctive in some way? How? Is there anything remarkable about you? Your blue shirts? Your leather boots? Something that they immediately recognize as your ‘trademark’. According to Dana Lynch image consultant, your style matters for three reasons:

  1. People for impressions of you within a mere 3 seconds!

2. Your style makes you memorable.

3. Your style allows you to express who you are, which ultimately leads to an improved self-image and confidence.

If you are a doctor your patients will likely decide within seconds if they are going to take your advice.

Picture by Ronald Menti

How many senses do you engage?

How many of the five senses are engaged in your office? Sure people see things, hear things and touch things but are their other senses stimulated?  Do they associate your office with a smell or a taste? What is it? If you are  a doctor it’s not likely to be something pleasant. But if you are and have done something about it then Elizabeth Ely sounds like she would approve:

Just what is it about medical disinfectant? It just smells so, well, medical. So like it’s covering up sick, and bringing you along with it, pulling you under its odourous spell.

Picture by Your Best Digs

How do you end your meetings?

We know how to start a meeting- we stand up, shake hands, say hello, smile. But what’s the best way to end a meeting? It matters for one reason:

The peak–end rule is a psychological heuristic in which people judge an experience largely based on how they felt at its peak (i.e., its most intense point) and at its end, rather than based on the total sum or average of every moment of the experience. The effect occurs regardless of whether the experience is pleasant or unpleasant. Wikipedia

If you are a doctor this is all the more important because people generally don’t seek a meeting with you because all is well. They may be experiencing all sorts of unpleasant feelings. So how do you end that meeting? How do you know it’s working?

Picture by Peter Lee

How does your skill at communicating manifest in your interactions?

It is assumed that doctors have to be specialists in communication. People will tell doctors things they may not confide in anyone else- much less a total stranger. That is part of the equity in the business of doctoring. So if you are a doctor, how does that manifest in your interactions with the people who seek your help? Is it reflected in your greetings? In your body language? In your eye contact? In the way you phrase your questions? In the way you terminate your meetings?

Picture by Paul Moody

When did your doctor last ‘do nothing’?

When was the last time your doctor, or you, if you were the doctor, ‘do nothing’ in the consultation? We don’t feel we have received or delivered value in the consultation unless we prescribe something, order a test or make a referral. But what does that tell us about the business of doctoring or the attitude to medicine?

Picture by AnaC

 

Essentialism wins

Dear Friends,

I have decided to take a break from my blog for a little while and focus on writing my book.

Sometimes it is a case of realising that you must invest in the big things in your life.

Thank you to my partner and mentor Bernadette. In case you are wondering-yes, she is even better than you know.

Thank you to Greg McKeown for persuading me to focus.

See you again very soon.

Moyez.

Picture by Bethan