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Is normal too thin?

Try this experiment. If you are tending to overweight ( Body Mass Index (BMI) 25 or over) then try to get to BMI 18.5 -24.9.  If you succeed people will decide you have lost ‘too much weight’  even when your BMI is in the middle of the normal range. If normal was defined as ‘what is most common’ then to have a ‘normal’ BMI is unusual and we may have become blind to normal so that what we perceive as ‘normal’ is not ideal. Rates of overweight and obesity are now at 60-70%.

In an Australian study on the public perception of body size the authors report that:

Overweight participants were also most likely to incorrectly identify themselves as a healthy weight (67 per cent, p<0.001), compared to 12 per cent of obese participants . The majority (89 per cent) of normal weight participants accurately identified themselves as being a healthy weight. Flanagan et al

Therefore it is not surprising that when people are challenged about their weight in healthcare they are reluctant to identify the issue as a problem.

Picture by Phil Gradwell

What price do you pay?

Looking back it was the right decision for me. I decided to choose a different career the day I wiped mayonnaise off my tie. I didn’t want to have my meals on the run. The job wasn’t for me if the price was regularly having to eat out of a paper bag rushing around from place to place or sitting at my desk. Others felt differently. I had to make a choice that worked for me.

While 62 percent of doctors who were normal or underweight reported eating a healthy diet rich in fruits and vegetables, the survey revealed that 44 percent of heavier doctors eat a diet high in carbs, meat and fat, or “on the go” meals. Just 16 percent of doctors who were considered overweight or obese were on a diet meant to help them lose weight or restrict calories. Life

Picture by Chris Blakeley.

What is your approach to the biggest health risk of our time?

Sixty to eighty percent of people are now overweight or obese. This is associated with considerable morbidity. Yet it is a very complex issue and the causes of the condition are many and varied.

…..the dramatic rise in the incidence of obesity in many countries appears to be due to the complex interaction of a variety of factors including genetic, physiologic, environmental, psychological, social, economic, and political. Wright and Aronne

The experience of overweight people with healthcare professionals is not universally good.

Seventy‐six individuals (aged 16–72) were interviewed. Most had struggled with their weight for most of their lives (n = 45). Almost all had experienced stigma and discrimination in childhood (n = 36), as adolescents (n = 41) or as adults (n = 72). About half stated that they had been humiliated by health professionals because of their weight. Thomas et al

Over my whole 40 year dieting history I found two doctors who have said ‘well, come back once a week or once a fortnight and I will weigh you’. I found that very helpful and useful, because you feel like somebody is on your side. (65 year old female)

 They have helped because they guided me and pointed things out and they were there for me. If I’ve got questions they are helpful. (28 year old female)

 Oh well, I have spoken to my doctor about it and he just says get more exercise. I did mention it to one other doctor and he said there is only one way to lose weight and that’s meal replacement drinks or tablets. So I never went back to him because I don’t agree with that. (49 year old male)

 My doctor keeps saying, you need to lose weight. And I say, yes, I know that and I want to and I try to watch what I am eating, but it is just getting harder and harder. (59 year old female)

If you are a healthcare professional it is very likely that you will see several people today who are overweight or obese. How will you raise the topic with them? How will you know they want to address the issue? What help will your offer? How do you know you have been helpful to others in these circumstances?

Picture by Paola Kizette Cimenti

Where were you when I was bored and saw this?

The triggers are everywhere- Hungry? Thirsty? Bored? Sad? We have something for you right now. Meanwhile your advise is a quiet voice in the back of their mind. There is an entire industry dependent on people’s bad choices, they are not taking a holiday this year working on how to influence them more than your diet and exercise program. There’s another industry depending on those choices so that you- doctor- will prescribe their neatly packaged answer to the expanding waist lines and furred arteries. It’s about the economy. The show must go on.

Picture by osde8info

How do you know your solution is the best?

Healthcare professionals offer solutions to problems. Doctors at community healthcare offer a solution to another problem every 10-15 minutes. Meanwhile the people seen there are making choices that seem entirely unrelated.

I’ll eat this, I’ll drink that, I’ll spend my money on this. I’ll work here. I’ll interact with these people. I’ll frame my problem like this…..

Some seemingly unrelated choices impact on the solutions offered by their health practitioner. It may be that people carry on making choices that undo all the benefits offered in prescribed, neatly packaged and costly labelled boxes.

If you are in healthcare how do you know the solutions you are offering are effective or even the best available? Could you do better?

Picture by World Bank Photo Collection

Are you credible as a lifestyle coach?

The commonest conditions doctors encounter are illnesses directly related to poor life style choices. Diseases that arise because we eat too much and don’t take enough exercise.

People who seek healthcare advice will be told more often than not that they must make different choices. How credible is your advice as a doctor? How persuasive are you as the messenger? How could you do this better?

Picture by Cocoabiscuit ,

Do you prepare to disappoint?

In any business there will be time when you don’t see eye to eye with your customer.  In fact there will be times when you disagree with them because what they want is either impossible, illegal, unavailable or otherwise difficult for you to deliver.

You might encounter that situation more than once in the course of your day. You expect it right? So if you are a doctor how do you prepare to deliver that news to a patient?

Once you’ve dumped your baggage and assumptions, approached patients with humanity and compassion, and discovered the real problem, what’s your next step? That depends upon what the real problem you discovered is. Is the problem something that is your fault or one you can solve? Did the patient have expectations that weren’t correct? Have an honest and forthright discussion with them. If you can do that, you’ll be getting thank you cards from your patients for a very long time. David J. Norris, MD

Picture by LenaLandmine

When did your doctor last ‘do nothing’?

When was the last time your doctor, or you, if you were the doctor, ‘do nothing’ in the consultation? We don’t feel we have received or delivered value in the consultation unless we prescribe something, order a test or make a referral. But what does that tell us about the business of doctoring or the attitude to medicine?

Picture by AnaC

 

For sustained behaviour change: show don’t tell

BACKGROUND:
This randomised controlled study evaluated a computer-generated future self-image as a personalised, visual motivational tool for weight loss in adults.
METHODS:
One hundred and forty-five people (age 18-79 years) with a Body Mass Index (BMI) of at least 25 kg/m2 were randomised to receive a hard copy future self-image at recruitment (early image) or after 8 weeks (delayed image). Participants received general healthy lifestyle information at recruitment and were weighed at 4-weekly intervals for 24 weeks. The image was created using an iPad app called ‘Future Me’. A second randomisation at 16 weeks allocated either an additional future self-image or no additional image.
RESULTS:
Seventy-four participants were allocated to receive their image at commencement, and 71 to the delayed-image group. Regarding to weight loss, the delayed-image group did consistently better in all analyses. Twenty-four recruits were deemed non-starters, comprising 15 (21%) in the delayed-image group and 9 (12%) in the early-image group (χ2(1) = 2.1, p = 0.15). At 24 weeks there was a significant change in weight overall (p < 0.0001), and a difference in rate of change between groups (delayed-image group: -0.60 kg, early-image group: -0.42 kg, p = 0.01). Men lost weight faster than women. The group into which participants were allocated at week 16 (second image or not) appeared not to influence the outcome (p = 0.31). Analysis of all completers and withdrawals showed a strong trend over time (p < 0.0001), and a difference in rate of change between groups (delayed-image: -0.50 kg, early-image: -0.27 kg, p = 0.0008).
CONCLUSION:
One in five participants in the delayed-image group completing the 24-week intervention achieved a clinically significant weight loss, having received only future self-images and general lifestyle advice. Timing the provision of future self-images appears to be significant, and promising for future research to clarify their efficacy.

Trials. 2017 Apr 18;18(1):180. doi: 10.1186/s13063-017-1907-6.

Picture by Rene Passet

Dog walking may assist weight control

Height and weight were measured for 281 children aged 5–6 years and 864 children aged 10–12 years. One parent reported their own and their partner’s height and weight (n=1,108), dog ownership, usual frequency their child walks a dog, and usual frequency of walking the dog as a family. Logistic regression analyses were adjusted for sex (children only), physical activity, education, neighbourhood SES, parental weight status (children only) and clustering by school.

Dog ownership ranged from 45–57% in the two age groups. Nearly one in four 5–6 year-olds and 37% of 10–12 year-olds walked a dog at least once/week. Weekly dog walking as a family was reported by 24–28% of respondents. The odds of being overweight or obese were lower among younger children who owned a dog (OR=0.5, 95% CI 0.3–0.8) and higher among mothers whose family walked the dog together (OR=1.3, 95% CI 1.0–1.7). Health Promotion Journal of Australia

Picture by astrid westvang