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Innovating locally

The foreign-looking chap in the baseball cap, the one wearing a pair of torn jeans and a singlet, the one on the mobile phone, sporting a dragon tatoo on this forearm might be a famous musician and the only son of a bedridden widow. But you’ve decided he is  probably a drug addict and treat him with suspicion and hostility. On the other hand the smartly dressed, attractive white woman carrying the brief case might be a drug dealer and you greet her with a welcoming smile. I was born of an ethnicity that wherever I have lived or worked people I meet for the first time assume things about me that are false, even laughable. Before I open my mouth, my students are invited to guess the nationality on my passport, the city where I was born and my first language. They mostly get it wrong. Therefore I do people the courtesy of not making assumptions. Often in medicine the doctor is the only person who will treat some people with respect in a day when they have to contend with lots of challenging behaviours, whether because of their appearance, their accent, their culture, the clothes they wear, their disability or their needs.

I should not have been surprised by research that suggests that doctors know very little about their patients. And least surprising was the finding:

Physicians were poorer judges of patients’ beliefs when patients were African-American (desire for partnership) (p=0.013), Hispanic (meaning) (p=0.075), or of a different race (sense of control) (p=0.024).

Street and Haidet

Could a doctor pick out a patient’s partner, whom they have never met from a police line up? Would they know what car that person drove? Would they have any idea what their patient had for breakfast? Where that person is planning to go on holiday ? What they wanted to be when they grew up? In many cases it doesn’t matter but as innovators we feel we are able to develop interventions that will make it more likely that those very people will comply with our prescriptions, give up smoking, eat more vegetables, wear a condom and monitor their chronic condition. Not all at once of course!

Technology now allows us to take a bird’s eye view of our practices. We record key parameters for people who attend our clinics- for example blood pressure, cholesterol and glycosylated haemoglobin and can link that to geographical data- demonstrating where our poorly controlled diabetics live. We might like to guess before we are presented with the data- I bet we would be way off the mark.

Then we can see if there is public transport to bring those people to the clinic. Where they buy their food. Whether there are open spaces and leisure centres within reach.  Could those people easily attend an optician or a podiatrist? Only then should we contemplate something locally that will make it more likely to improve outcomes. But only after we check our assumptions with the people for whom the innovation would be designed. This work has a local flavour- ineffective innovations are designed on a ‘one-size fits all’ model as if everyone lives in an affluent middle class neighbourhood and seek care at the convenience of the healthcare provider. To quote Idris Moottee:

The customer is King, Queen and Jack. Any innovation efforts will fail eventually if the end user is not driven to use your new product or service. Most consumers are intelligent and can contribute so much to the process. It is true that people can not always voice their needs and desires in a way that makes sense, but our job is find creative ways to understand their attitudes, values and behaviors and figure out how to include them in your innovation process.

Meanwhile my friend Alan Leeb noticed that people are wedded to their mobile phones and are likely to respond to an SMS from his practice. So now each time his nurse administers a vaccine, the practice sends them an SMS asking if they had any sort of adverse reaction. The practice is now able to monitor reactions to vaccines in real time, that means if there are severe reactions his practice will know within 24-48 hours, probably faster than any other agency. This information might just help to save lives in his practice but perhaps in yours too.

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