Why when you are sick don’t you do what you can to help yourself?

At 68 Frank has been prescribed the usual mix of medications: three different drugs for blood pressure, a statin and two different pain killers. His problems, as he lists them are fatigue, snoring and back pain. From his doctor’s perspective, the problems are obesity, a dreadful diet, and sedentary lifestyle.

OK doc, but I think I need a referral for my snoring.

Two weeks ago he wanted a different pain killer and the week before that he wanted to be referred to a physiotherapist. The major challenge in helping people who are struggling with chronic disease is persuading them that they have the wherewithal to slow or possibly cease the march towards disability. It seems incredible that someone who cannot walk to the end of the street without stopping for breath several times cannot see any reason to stop eating junk food and sugary drinks while watching telly from 6 pm until two in the morning. Bad habits will drive choices even when people are aware of their growing disabilities. There may be many reasons for this but one that may be worth considering is boredom.

Our culture’s obsession with external sources of entertainment—TV, movies, the Internet, video games—may also play a role in increasing boredom. “I think there is something about our modern experience of sensory overload where there is not the chance and ability to figure out what your interests, what your passions are,” says John Eastwood, a clinical psychologist at York University in Toronto. Anna Gosline.

What is challenging is that some people who have already developed a life-limiting illness cannot be ‘educated’ to make different choices while they don’t admit even to themselves how and why they are contributing to their own demise. If healthcare is to actively promote well-being we need to find ways to help people identify when they are bored and not just focus on the consequences including atheromatous vascular disease. The role of doctors needs to include tackling harmful habits and not limited to therapeutics.

Picture by Craig Sunter

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