Why general practitioners are crucial to the economy

The odds of experiencing an event that will descend you briefly into your own private hell are significant.

These odds are much greater than the odds of getting something that requires heroic intervention:

Good news = You are more likely to catch a cold, sprain an ankle or have a runny nose than suffer anything more serious.

Bad news = What happens if you get one of the aforementioned ‘minor illnesses’.  I am living with fractured ribs this week. This is what happens:

  • You are told there is no treatment and no definite recovery period.
  • You can’t tie your own shoe laces, take off your socks or dry your back after a shower.
  • You can’t push open doors.
  • You can’t get out of, our turn over, in bed.
  • You dare not sneeze or pick anything off the ground.
  • You get persistent headaches because of paravertebral muscle strain.

The pain will get worse before it gets better. So at first you might go to the emergency department (ED) because your family will insist. At the ED you will be X-rayed. You will be prescribed analgesia and advised to take time off.  A day or two later in increasing pain you will toy with the idea of going back to hospital just in case they’ve missed something.  The codeine will cause constipation making things worse. Some doctors will advise you to take tramol others will advise against it. A specialist might recommend intercostal nerve blocks (anything looks like a nail when you are armed with a hammer). The cost of getting medical attention will mount. What you will need the most is symptom relief and a greater sense of control. Your only hope is a good GP.

In desperation you might consult YouTube for any useful hints on how to recover. This person has clearly never experienced rib fractures. I hope no medical student thinks this is how to approach the examination of anyone with this condition. On the other hand this person clearly has.

Health economists tell us that the increased costs in the healthcare system are due to unnecessary tests and treatments.

On average, a 50-year-old now is seeing doctors more often, having more tests and operations, and taking more prescription drugs, than a 50-year-old did ten years ago

You are at greater risk of ‘minor illness’ than any other illness. Yet we know that is when we are likely to request tests and treatments in the vain hope it will hasten the recovery. Good GPs  reduce this morbidity as well as the cost of caring for people when time is the only treatment.

This week we launched the Journal of Health Design. The scope of our journal is to support researchers who are developing innovations inspired by the patient experience of healthcare. This was also the week that the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners supported our team to conduct research that aims at supporting GPs in consultations with people with viral infections when antibiotics are not indicated.

Picture by Matt Pelletier

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