We have to be part of the solution because we are part of the problem

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She blinked at me expectantly. Her companion sat in the corner of the room, arms folded staring at the floor. She glanced at him side ways and then said in a loud whisper

We are here about that business last week. You know.

I didn’t know. So I frantically searched through the notes. The man in question had been seen here several times recently for various dressings. Nothing to say how he had been injured or the nature of the wound. At that point she lost it.

I don’t like talking about it in front of him! Because of his you know……well I told the doctor everything a couple of weeks ago. We need a report for the police and a referral for counselling.

I was mystified. The cryptic notes mentioned an injury to the arm and the application of various dressings but nothing about a bashing. She would have to see ‘the other doctor’ for the report. He was on holiday and not expected back for 10 days. Neither of us was satisfied. The next patient didn’t help matters. She had been pushed to the ground at the railway station and injured her wrist. She had been to the Emergency Department a couple of days ago and had been sent to the practice for an X-ray report. I assumed that someone had seen the X-rays and that she hadn’t been discharged with a bony injury. But there was no note from the Emergency doctor, hand written or otherwise and I now had to spend the next 20 minutes listening to musak while the ward clerk searched for a copy of the report and faxed it to me. In any other industry this waste of time would be tweeted as an example of bad service.

Meanwhile we are spending millions of dollars in search of electronic records that will somehow transform continuity of care. The assumption is that given such a record a doctor will document the circumstances in which she has come to reviewing a patient repeatedly or that the emergency department will reliably record why a patient was fit to be discharged. All of this is possible now if only doctors will plan for when the patient turns up when they are on a day off or choose to go to another provider. Hours can be saved each day, millions of dollars can be redeployed to make a system that already serves us well even better.

Assuming the technical challenge of a personal electronic record can be overcome the question is whether such a record will deliver its promise given that not all who work in healthcare are committed to treating the patient as they would wish to be treated themselves. There is no doubt that the free flow of information will help improve healthcare provision however the most valuable data that helps us serve people (history and examination) have to be documented by a human rather than a machine. Innovation should start with a change in the mindset of those who work in an industry. Are you confident that no one you served today would have to have their problems reassessed if you didn’t show up for work tomorrow? If so then we will be on the way to better outcomes overnight.

It’s also hoped the new system will reduce the high rate of medical errors (18%) that occur from inadequate patient information, reduce unnecessary hospital admissions, and save doctors from collecting a full medical history each time they see a new patient. The conversation

Picture by Ben Hussman

 

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