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Testing assumptions before innovating

Successful innovations are based on addressing ‘real’ problems. They are not founded on assumptions that haven’t been tested. All too often we are presented with ideas that don’t really address the problem from the perspective of the end user. Usually these innovations are designed to solve someone else’s problem and then foisted on an unsuspecting end user. The result is the creation of yet another problem and worse of all wasted resources at a time when economies are under strain.  There is another way. In a very generous contribution with a more sensible approach Julius Parrisius offers this brilliant slide deck. It involves actually finding out what the ‘client’ aka end user needs from you to get through their day, what they find challenging about the problem in question and what’s on their wish list.

The issue in healthcare is that many value propositions are hard to pin down, either because the circumstance are relatively uncommon or because people don’t want to talk about them. They include people presenting/ experiencing:

  • Cancer symptoms- especially the kind that involve embarrassing symptoms- diarrhoea or offensive discharging from unmentionable orifices.
  • Psychosexual problems
  • Sexually transmitted disease
  • Substance abuse
  • Death and dying

Sure you can organise focus groups with a handful of ‘representative stakeholders’ but are you really going to get to the truth? The whole truth? There isn’t really a better way then observing the interaction between practitioner and patient. The challenge is that no one wants you or your video camera in the room while they confess their problem and the care professional doesn’t care for this either. Ethics committees tend to agree. What’s more this preliminary, hypotheses generating research is seldom funded by anyone and sounds daunting- much more so than calling up a friendly ‘stakeholder’ from your list and taking it for granted that they know what they are talking about. So you enlist the ‘support’ of your token end user on one of your ‘project steering groups’ and then hope and pray that they haven’t misled you. Unfortunately it can persuade grant committees that you have done your homework. They won’t find out until they read the press following a launch of your baby and discover that other end users don’t agree. Then you…start again, if anyone still trusts you.

The other issue is that you may also uncover evidence that could land the professional end user into some difficulty-failure to provide evidence based practice with actual patients cannot be overlooked if it is likely to put people at risk in the future. You have a responsibility to protect people- notwithstanding your role as innovator. So, where to from here? How do you get behind closed doors without interrupting the business at hand and while also allowing the practitioner to demonstrate their ‘pain’ with this problem/ issue? Our team has done well deploying simulations. It has allows us to generate and even test hypotheses in an environment in which people have not been put at risk and also relatively quickly allowed us to duck blind alleys before we were committed to them. The key is to accept that the rubber always hit the road when the person with the problem seeks help- in our setting that is usually when they present to a general practitioner /primary care physician/ family doctor and therefore the stage, the props and the actors are already defined- all we have to do is produce enough of the script to let the cast develop the plot- the rest is done by the participants and the truth will out.

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