The future of healthcareLearn More

A cough is not minor in any sense

 

 Acute cough, which often follows an upper respiratory tract infection, may be initially disruptive but is usually self‐limiting and rarely needs significant medical intervention. Thorax

In adults or children with acute cough, the evidence does not support the effectiveness of over the counter preparations. Cochrane Review

On the other hand:

Oral syrups segment is expected to expand at 2.9% CAGR (Compound annual growth rate) over the estimated period and be valued more than US$ 10 Bn by the end of 2026. The segment is expected to create absolute $ opportunity of a little more than US$ 300 Mn in 2017 over 2016. The segment is the most acceptable dosage form for cough, cold, and sore throat medicines due to ease of administration and pleasant taste. The oral syrups segment dominated the global cold, cough and sore throat remedies market in terms of revenue in 2016 and the trend is projected to continue throughout the forecast period. Oral syrups segment is the most attractive segment, with attractiveness index of 1.5 over the forecast period. FMI

Cough, cough, cough. Every hour on the hour. There appears to be no end to it this season. No symptom is driving more people to seek treatment than the misery of upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs). The impact of the URTIs season on the population is massive as has been demonstrated in data from the US:

More than half (52%) of Americans reported that their cold impacted their daily life a fair amount to a lot. Productivity decreased by a mean 26.4%, and 44.5% of respondents reported work/school absenteeism (usually one to two days) during a cold. Overall, 93% of survey participants reported difficulty sleeping. Among all respondents, 57% reported cough or nasal congestion as the symptoms making sleep difficult. Drug Store News

One issue that appears to be bound up with the epidemic of URTIs is rates of prescribing of antibiotics. Here the available data are encouraging:

Professor Bell suggests that 20–25% of acute URTIs are likely to need antibiotics…..We have shown that over the last 13 years GPs in Australia have decreased their level of prescribing of antibiotics for acute URTI and to a lesser degree, for ‘other RTIs’. Britt et al

However there is an opportunity here over and above the treatment of an annoying self-limiting infection. Most people who seek help want more than anything else to feel better. By 2026 they will spend $10Bn in the attempt. The conversations in consulting rooms and pharmacies around the country focus on symptoms that will improve, eventually. Antibiotics won’t help. But, in the end what people want is to feel better not a lecture on virology. There is an opportunity for a ‘set play’.

Yes, you have a nasty infection and I see that it is making you miserable. Here’s what you can do to help your self.

There is an opportunity to forge a relationship with the patient. The ritual of the consultation complete with examination has the potential to create enormous deposit of social capital. Something that might be critical when the patient presents later in life with life-limiting pathology. There is the chance to understand a lot more about the patient for whom a cold is the final straw. But what’s the context? Be curious, very curious that’s why it’s called the art of medicine.

Picture by Rebecca Brown

Why when you are sick don’t you do what you can to help yourself?

At 68 Frank has been prescribed the usual mix of medications: three different drugs for blood pressure, a statin and two different pain killers. His problems, as he lists them are fatigue, snoring and back pain. From his doctor’s perspective, the problems are obesity, a dreadful diet, and sedentary lifestyle.

OK doc, but I think I need a referral for my snoring.

Two weeks ago he wanted a different pain killer and the week before that he wanted to be referred to a physiotherapist. The major challenge in helping people who are struggling with chronic disease is persuading them that they have the wherewithal to slow or possibly cease the march towards disability. It seems incredible that someone who cannot walk to the end of the street without stopping for breath several times cannot see any reason to stop eating junk food and sugary drinks while watching telly from 6 pm until two in the morning. Bad habits will drive choices even when people are aware of their growing disabilities. There may be many reasons for this but one that may be worth considering is boredom.

Our culture’s obsession with external sources of entertainment—TV, movies, the Internet, video games—may also play a role in increasing boredom. “I think there is something about our modern experience of sensory overload where there is not the chance and ability to figure out what your interests, what your passions are,” says John Eastwood, a clinical psychologist at York University in Toronto. Anna Gosline.

What is challenging is that some people who have already developed a life-limiting illness cannot be ‘educated’ to make different choices while they don’t admit even to themselves how and why they are contributing to their own demise. If healthcare is to actively promote well-being we need to find ways to help people identify when they are bored and not just focus on the consequences including atheromatous vascular disease. The role of doctors needs to include tackling harmful habits and not limited to therapeutics.

Picture by Craig Sunter

Deploy rituals and be present in practice

Your next patient or client will want you to:

  • Smile (23.2%);
  • Be friendly, personable, polite, respectful (19.2%);
  • Be attentive and calm, make the patient feel like a priority (16.4%);
  • and make eye contact (13.0%).

(An Evidence-Based Perspective on Greetings in Medical Encounters- Arch Intern Med)

Showing up this way for every patient has to be a habit. Essentially you need to be “present or “mindful”. The issue of mindful practice has also been the focus of academic interest:

In 2008, the authors conducted in-depth, semistructured interviews with primary care physicians .. mindfulness skills improved the participants’ ability to be attentive and listen deeply to patients’ concerns, respond to patients more effectively, and develop adaptive reserve. Academic Medicine.

To make a habit of showing up in this way it may be worth considering deploying a ritual.

Hurdler Michelle Jenneke has her famous warm-up dance, long-jumper Fabrice Lapierre competes with a gold chain in his mouth, Usain Bolt points to the sky before breaking yet another world record, while Michael Phelps blasts Eminem to fire him up before hitting the pool. My body+soul

Consider the distinction between a habit and a ritual:

Habit

An acquired behavior pattern regularly followed until it has become almost involuntary: the habit of looking both ways before crossing the street.

Ritual

An act or series of acts regularly repeated in a set precise manner.

Rituals support habit and focus. Rituals support you to repeat habits and create new behaviour patterns over time. Daily rituals can support you to make new habits stick. You can move from doing something that might take a lot of effort, to it becoming almost automatic or done unconsciously. Mary- Ann Webb

Establishing a ritual can be the prelude to a habit.

The term ritual refers to a type of expressive, symbolic activity constructed of multiple behaviors that occur in a fixed, episodic sequence, and that tend to be repeated over time. Ritual behavior is dramatically scripted and acted out and is performed with formality, seriousness, and inner intensity. Rook, Dennis W. (1985), “The Ritual Dimension of Consumer Behavior,” Journal of Consumer Research, 12 (December), 251-264.

The pathway goes from behaviour, to ritual and then to habit. Charles Duhigg  spoke of the ‘habit loop’.This loop has three components:

  • The Cue: This is the trigger that tells your brain to go into automatic mode and which habit to use.
  • The Routine: This is the behaviour itself. This can be an emotional, mental or physical behaviour.
  • The Reward: This is the reason you’re motivated to do the behaviour and a way your brain can encode the behaviour in your neurology, if it’s a repeated behaviour.

All habitual cues fit into one of five categories: location, time, emotional state, other people, and immediately preceding action. An immediately preceding action is the most stable cue because it’s triggered by an existing habit. So to build a new habit match it with an old habitual cue.

B.J. Fogg, asks:

“What does this behaviour most naturally follow?”

To implement this technique, decide on an existing habit and complete the following sentence:

“After I [EXISTING HABIT] I will immediately [NEW HABIT]”.

Therefore to make a habit of being present for the next patient the “cue” is when you terminate the previous consultation.

The “routine” or ritual: At the end of one consult you might close the notes, tidy your desk and wash your hands. Metaphorically you also wash the previous consult out of your mind. This has physical and psychological components.

Then when you are happy that the previous consult no longer lingers in your thoughts proceed to the next consult, stand in a specific spot, call the patient, introduce yourself and smile. Shake the patient’s hand. Walk with them to the consulting room. Don’t start the consult until you make eye contact. How the patient responds to such a greeting is the “reward“.

Picture by Rob Bertholf

She’s furious but what does your reaction say about you?

Where there is anger there is fear. Health issues are frightening. They pose a real and sometimes imminent threat to our basic needs. Sometimes even a threat to life itself.

There is a strong relationship between anger and fear. Anger is the fight part of the age-old fight-or-flight response to threat. Most animals respond to threat by either fighting or fleeing. But, we don’t always have the option to fight what threatens us. Instead, we have anger. Psychology 

Anger is an emotion that doctors encounter often. Unfortunately they may also find themselves getting annoyed at that angry patient who has been kept waiting, that angry mother who thinks her child’s test results should be available today, that angry young man who says he will be fired unless he gets a backdated certificate, that angry Boomer who is convinced her cancer can be cured if only this doctor arranges an appointment for coffee enemas.

Doctors can choose how to respond. How to interpret that emotion. Doctors too can be angry. Angry about having to work in a healthcare system where one sector doesn’t coordinate with another, a payment schedule that doesn’t reward for time spent waiting on the phone, a system where people come with undifferentiated problems and can’t give a clear history of their symptoms. They can choose whether or not to express this emotion during a heated conversation.

At the end of the day, doctors can go home- for the mother of the child with cystic fibrosis, the young man with the heartless employer, the old lady with bowel cancer there is no such escape. A response that may help is to acknowledge the anger but address the fear. It may even reduce the frequency with which people might see the doctor standing in the way of something they think will immediately reduce the threat. It may also help when doctors are angry that those who are the target of that anger confront the issues rather engage in recrimination.

Picture by Petras Gaglias 

Doctors get to choose so much of what matters

You choose what you wear. They own the building, they chose the furniture, they employed the staff, they chose the wallpaper, they decided the policies, they set the opening hours. But whoever ‘they’ are there are only two people in the consultation. You and the patient.

You choose:

  • Your mood today
  • If you shake the patient’s hand
  • If you introduce yourself
  • Where you sit in the room
  • Where you look
  • When you stop talking
  • Whether you examine the patient
  • What you think
  • What you say and how you say it
  • What you do
  • How you terminate the consultation

And the patient chooses whether they like it.

Guess what? You get to choose so much of what matters to the patient. Choose well. You can make a difference. Create a better future for everyone.

Picture by Gilbert Rodriguez

Much of what’s wrong with healthcare is in the consulting room

It’s not that complicated. Not really. So where do you look for pathology? Inspection, palpation, percussion and auscultation. How does it look, how does it feel, how does it sound and what do you hear when you know where to listen closely. I’m talking about healthcare. Take a helicopter ride through your business.

Access

What is the route to your service? Where is the delay? How long do people wait in the waiting room? How do you know? What do you know about the people who use your service even before they are seated in your waiting room?

Greeting

What happens when people call or arrive in person? What message is conveyed?

Welcome we’ll do our best to help you today OR you are lucky we are ‘fitting you in’.

Just stand there- I’m dealing with someone on the phone.

We have no time- go complain to the manager/politician/ bureaucrat-consider yourself drafted to the cause.

Hold the line. We are dealing with something far more important but your call is really important to us so just listen to how good we are as conveyed by our prerecorded message.

Associated with that is what is perceived about your attitude that is not verbalised?

Look at ALL these posters and the many ways you can be helping yourself instead of wasting our time.

People vomit and pee while they wait so the seats have to be cleaned with detergent. Plastic is the best option.

If you want a drink go buy one at a cafe.

We rely on donations for our toys and magazines- we don’t have to provide anything OK? Now if you don’t like the stuff just watch Dr. Phil.

What do you mean you have been waiting a couple of hours? This isn’t McDonalds now take a ticket, sit down, shut up and wait. And turn off your phone so you can hear the old lady at the desk who has an embarrassing problem.

Communication

How long is the meeting with the provider? How does that meeting unfold? What is conveyed during the meeting?

Welcome- I’m so sorry you are not well. Tell me what happened? OR I haven’t got long what do you want exactly, spit it out be quick about it I need to get on with the next guy. Didn’t you see the queue out there?

I’m the important one around here- you are lucky I’ve chosen to be here today. Let me tell you about my holiday, my kids, my new car. It’s fascinating really!

Room 5. Quickly. Never mind my name.

Test/ Referral and Prescription

What action is taken at the consult and are you confident that is the best possible action?

I don’t have time for talk- have this test and take another day off to see me next week.

I don’t have time for you to take off your umpteen layers- go have a scan.

The rep told me this works- I only have to write a script.

If you want to get better take my medicine/advice/ referral or get lost.

What medicine do you want? How do you spell that? Tell me slowly I’m writing it down on your script.

Outcome

What proportion of people takes your advice/medicine/test? How many people stopped smoking? How many were triggered to lose weight? How many are addicted to prescribed medicines? How many were prescribed treatment or tests that were not indicated? Where’s your data? What are your plans for dealing with this?

Team

To what extent can you say that when people transition to another healthcare professional either on site or elsewhere that the relevant information follows them? Is everyone on the same page with the same patient?

All of this matters. All of it. Some of you can fix tomorrow. No need to wait for another round of healthcare reform. No one said it was easy. And whatever their business the best don’t compromise.  A lot of what can be fixed in healthcare takes place behind the closed doors of the consulting room.

Picture by Daniele Oberti

We don’t have to agree but it doesn’t have to end in tears

I told him NO. You don’t need antibiotics you have a virus. Now leave.

This is the rather macho way in which the story of how a patient’s ‘unreasonable’ request was rejected is sometimes recounted. In some cases the law was changed to allow people to access some items much more readily:

In some countries, potent drugs are now losing their efficacy because of unregulated access. The stage is set for disagreement and inevitably it comes when the provider does not have a plan for how to tackle the request that is not in the patient’s best interest or does not address associated risks that patient is taking. Arguments might be even more common were it not for the evidence that healthcare providers sometimes act without assessing the requests fully. This makes matters worse because it raises unreasonable expectations. In one recent study it was reported:

In spite of the requirement that pharmacists sell restricted medicines, shoppers often found it difficult to distinguish pharmacists from other pharmacy staff. Shoppers were able to confirm that a pharmacist was definitely involved in only 46% of visits. In 8.8% of the diclofenac visits, and 10.8% of the visits for vaginal anti-fungals, no counselling was provided. The vaginal anti-fungal visits tended to be more product-focussed than the diclofenac visits. When they purchased diclofenac, most pharmacists asked shoppers if they had, or had had, stomach problems (74.6%) or asthma (65.4%). A minority asked about the symptoms of the vaginal fungal infection which the female shoppers presented with. While most pharmacies recorded patient names, many did so in a way which compromised patient confidentiality. Pharmacy World and Science

Similarly, it has been shown that performance varies in general practice:

In more than one-in-eight cases, the patient was not investigated or referred. Patient management varied significantly by cancer type (p<0.001). For two key reasons, colorectal cancer was the chosen referent category. First, it represents a prevalent type of cancer. Second, in this study, colorectal cancer symptoms were managed in a similar proportion of options—that is, prescription, referral or investigation. Compared with vignettes featuring colorectal cancer participants were less likely to manage breast, bladder, endometrial, and lung cancers with a ‘prescription only’ or ‘referral only’ option. They were less likely to manage prostate cancer with a ‘prescription only’, yet more likely to manage it with a ‘referral with investigation’. With regard to pancreatic and cervical cancers, participants were more likely to manage these with a ‘referral only’ or a ‘referral with investigation’. BMJ open

In summary:

  1. People often present with ideas that are at odds with those of the provider.
  2. The law sometimes enshrines the right to over the counter treatments that may not be indicated or may actually harm people.
  3. Patients are not appropriately assessed in all cases which mean they either acquire things that are not appropriate or denied things that are.

Once the decision is made to say no it isn’t always handled well. This has also been demonstrated in the literature. What has been published suggests that one of the most potent tools in the armory are good consultation skills. The more worrying issue is how this comes as news to some in a profession that pride itself on members’ ability to communicate. The bottom line is that any business that loses the relationship with its clients is heading for the rocks. Every business knows that there are polite ways to reject a customer. Therefore the answer to the question of whether and what to prescribe is a function of the consultation skills taught to every medical graduate. The issue at stake when things go wrong is how well those skills are being exercised. The quote at the top of this post suggests that some doctors need a refresher.

Picture by Jens Karlsson

The country needs general practice to be the provider of choice

Ever since I came to Australia as a foreign graduate I have been obliged to work in a so-called ‘area of need’. Directly opposite one practice in such a location, there is a large shopping centre. I sometimes go across the road to get my lunch. I noticed several very busy outlets full to the brim with customers. Here is a price list of some of what they offer:

  1. Reflexology Foot care (20 mins) $40
  2. Deep tissue and relaxation oil massage 30 mins: $50
  3. Headache treatment (30 mins) $30
  4. Sciatica relief $45

The practice across the road is a ‘bulk billing practice’ (i.e. they do not charge more than the government subsidy). The practice feels that people ‘can’t afford to pay’. I often see the same people queueing up for the treatments mentioned above. Today ( Sunday 26th February) there is a full page add in local newspaper headed:

Hope has arrived for men over 40 with low testosterone. Now, as part of our national health drive , a limited number of Australian Men can get free assessment before 5/03/17.

A box on the page asks:

Do these symptoms sound familiar?

  • Sleep problems
  • Increased need for sleep/ feeling tired
  • Physical exhaustion /lacking vitality
  • Deceased muscular strength
  • Irritability
  • Nervousness
  • Depressive symptoms
  • Raised cholesterol
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Lowered libido
  • Prostate symptoms

The advertisement claimed that:

Studies show that only 10% of men are receiving treatment for low testosterone.

Citing as evidence one academic paper. The other citations are to reports on a news channel. The conclusions of the academic paper are based on a survey of 2165 men attending a primary care clinic in the United States regardless of the reason for attendance. Hypogonadism was defined as follows:

Given the lack of a widely accepted single threshold value of TT to define hypogonadism, <300 ng/dl, which has been used in clinical studies of hypogonadal men, seemed a reasonable choice. (Mulligan et al)

On this basis man with testosterone, levels below 300ng/dl were classified as hypogonadal and their symptoms were attributed to that condition. The team concluded:

The difference in the occurrence of four of the six common symptoms of hypogonadism (decrease in ability to perform sexually, decrease in sexual desire or libido, physical exhaustion or lacking vitality, and decline in general feeling of well-being) was greater in hypogonadal vs. eugonadal patients (p < 0.05).

None of the men were examined for other causes of their symptoms or problems. And on the basis of this research, a clinic operating in Australia is marketing therapy that:

….stimulates natural testosterone production

There is no mention of the cost of this treatment anywhere on the advertisement. The only protection that we offer people in the face of this very questionable marketing are the services of a trained general practitioner able to help people navigate this minefield of nonsense designed to part people from their hard-earned money. However, we need to create an experience that competes effectively with the powerful commercial offerings that are triggering people to spend their money so that they are then considered ‘unable to afford to pay’ for better advice.

Picture by Angie Muldowney

Junk used to wallpaper doctors’ offices

Of all the things doctors can do in their practice they can certainly choose what to display on their walls. In 1994 a group of researchers reported:

To determine whether patients read and remembered health promotion messages displayed in waiting rooms, 600 patients in a UK general practice were given a self-complete questionnaire. Two notice-boards carried between 1 to 4 topics over four study periods. Three-hundred and twenty-seven (55%) of subjects responded. Twenty-two per cent recalled at least one topic. Increasing the number of topics did not in crease the overall impact of the notice-boards. The numbers of patients recalling a topic remained constant, but increasing the number of topics reduced the number remembering each individual topic. Patients aged over 60 years were less likely to recall topics, but waiting time, gender and health professional seen had no effect on results. Very few patients (<10%) read or took health promotion leaflets. Wicke et al

It would appear that the notices are basically used as wallpaper. They do not seem to serve any other useful purpose. Researchers suggest that the design of such ‘community communication channels’ requires further thought:

Our results highlight how they are used for content of local and contextual relevance, and how cultures of participation, personalization, location, the tangible character of architecture, access, control and flexibility might affect community members’ level of engagement with them. Fortin et al

Essentially the role of the notice board with its myriad of posters and leaflets is to ‘sell and inform’ not to decorate and distract. They sell ‘health’ or services related to health. Vaccinations, antenatal care, weight loss, smoking cessation, early diagnosis, screening, the list is endless. They might also inform about practice policy. The notice board, or as it often seems almost every available space on the walls is used in a vain attempt to ‘communicate’ with people. But this sort of communication is carefully choreographed in the retail and service industry:

Businesses like gas stations and banks regularly provide information about the availability and price of particular items, such as gas, convenience items, loans, and savings certificates. The display of this information plays a central role in these companies’ business strategies for increasing traffic and sales. Indeed, the value of a corner or other highly-visible location rests largely on the ability to use signs to inform passers-by about the availability of a business’ goods and services. University of Cincinnati Economics Center

The way these notices are displayed can have an impact on the bottom line of the business:

In conclusion, exterior electronic message boards offer business a lift in store sales performance and generate a relatively quick return on investment. While the overall 2.12 percent lift in sales is modest, in a high-volume store with low installation costs, the investment returns to using this technology can be significant. University of Cincinnati Economics Center

Your bank, department store, hairdresser does not stick everything they have on their walls and hope for the best. The walls in a doctors’ premises are high-value real estate, not a back street that can be pasted with whatever junk is sent by whoever wants to get attention until the material becomes dog-eared or torn. The key is to focus on ‘content of local and contextual relevance’. However, in the end, the wall space should prepare the patient for the consultation. It is in the consultation that the advice can be tailored to the patient and as Wicke and colleagues concluded in 1994:

More modern methods of communication such as electronic notice-boards or videos could be used. However, the waiting room might best function not as an area where a captive audience can be bombarded with health promotion messages, but rather as a place for relaxation before consulting a health professional, making patients more receptive to health advice in the consultation. Wicke at al.

Would it really do any harm to jettison this confetti altogether?

Picture by Bala Sivakumar

Start the consultation as you mean to continue

What I consider this week requires no renovations, no insurance rebate or government subsidy. It does require clean hands. Yet the humble handshake has the power to catapult a meeting into an entirely different dimension.

Many of our social interactions may go wrong for a reason or another, and a simple handshake preceding them can give us a boost and attenuate the negative impact of possible misshapenings.  Dolcos

The importance of any act that makes for a more positive interaction is that doctors are more often than not in the ‘sales’ business. They ask us to ‘buy’ all the time:

  • Buy my advice
  • Buy the recommended tests
  • Buy this diagnosis
  • Buy the suggested lifestyle change
  • Buy these pills

On the other hand ( pardon the pun) some researchers have called for a ban on handshakes because they can spread infections. But are you more or less likely to ‘buy’ from someone who does not shake your hand?  The evidence that the simple handshake can make a huge difference to the outcome of a meeting is overwhelming but there is precious little written about it in the medical literature.  As recently as 2012 researchers at the University of Illinois noted that:

Despite its importance for peoplesʼ emotional well-being, the study of interpersonal and emotional effects of handshake has been largely neglected. Dolcos et al

We have all heard that handshakes have an impact on the outcome of job interviews. But perhaps more than any other literature consumer psychology has a lot more to say on the subject:

A successful sale depends on a customer’s perception of the salesperson’s personality, motivations, trustworthiness, and affect. Person perception research has shown that consistent and accurate assessments of these traits can be made based on very brief observations, or “thin slices.” Thus, examining impressions based on thin slices offers an effective approach to study how perceptions of salespeople translate into real-world results, such as sales performance and customer satisfaction….Participants rated 20-sec audio clips extracted from interviews with a sample of sales managers, on variables gauging interpersonal skills, task-related skills, and anxiety. Results supported the hypothesis that observability of the rated variable is a key determinant in the criterion validity of thin-slice judgments. Journal of Consumer Psychology.

We now have very sophisticated was to assess the impact of our behaviour on each other. And when functional MRI is deployed the data suggest:

A handshake preceding social interactions positively influenced the way individuals evaluated the social interaction partners and their interest in further interactions, while reversing the impact of negative impressions. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience

David Haslam (Said by the Health Service Journal to be the 30th most powerful person in the British National Health Service in December 2013) wrote:

Touch matters. Really matters. It is a highly complex act, and touch has become taboo. Touch someone’s hand in error on the bus or train and both parties will recoil with hurried exclamations of ‘sorry’. To touch someone has become an intimate act–generally limited to family, lovers, hairdressers and healthcare professionals. The very word carries significance. We say we are touched by an act when it moves us in a strongly positive emotional way. And all manner of other phrases have connotations that link touch to emotion–giving someone a shoulder to cry on, or saying ‘you can lean on me,’ ‘hold on,’ ‘get a grip,’ ‘a hands on experience,’ ‘keeping in touch,’ ‘out of touch’ and so on. For doctors, touch can be a vitally important part of our therapeutic armamentarium. I’ve lost count of the times that I’ve leant over and held someone’s hand when they started to cry in the consulting room. The healing touch

In a small study now a decade old, Mike Jenkins suggests that a spontaneous handshake proffered by the patient at the end of the consultation is a very good sign:

This small study suggests that most handshakes offered by patients towards the end of consultations reflect patient satisfaction — ‘the happy handshake’. Indeed, many reasons were recorded using superlatives such as ‘very’ and ‘much’ representing a high level of patient satisfaction — ‘the very happy handshake’. Mike Jenkins

It cost nothing- although, in some cultures, it may be taboo to shake hands. In most cases, it can only help to establish trust and improve the outcome of the consultation. Of course, if you care enough to want to engage with the patient you would wash your hands thoroughly before sticking out your hand but failing to make physical contact at the outset comes at an enormous cost of reducing the ability to put the patient at their ease.

Whatever we decide patients notice:

I saw one of your doctors today, she didn’t shake my hand, listen to my heart, do any type of extremities tests to verify my condition. Just referred me to another doctor. Is this the kind of poor medicine I can expect from the rest of your professionals? Mark Roberts, Facebook

Picture by Rachel