Tag Archives: Patient experience design

The chasm between patient experience and clinical practice

Can you guess what this abstract relates to without clicking on the link:

ABC is advisable if the patient does not show sustained improvement after a year of active treatment by other indicated means. The operation often represents the turning point in effective treatment. After the first year of ineffective treatment valuable time is being lost, with danger of fixation and deterioration. Then it is safer to operate than to wait. Calif Med. 1958 Jun; 88(6): 429–434.

That operation was last carried out in the 1960s. 40-50,000 were performed in the USA alone. This is what was reported about one person post op:

The reason for Dully’s lobotomy? His stepmother, Lou, said Dully was defiant, daydreamed and even objected to going to bed. If this sounds like a typical 12-year-old boy, that’s because he was.

What is being described below in 2011?

Remission of diabetes mellitus occurs in approximately 80 percent of patients after XYZ. Other obesity-related comorbidities are greatly reduced, and health-related quality of life improves. Complications and adverse effects are lowest with laparoscopic surgery, and vary by procedure and presurgical risk. Am Fam Physician. 2011 Oct 1;84(7):805-814.

In the same abstract the authors, Schroeder et al say:

The family physician is well positioned to care for obese patients by discussing surgery as an option for long-term weight loss…. Patient selection, pre surgical risk reduction, and postsurgical medical management, with nutrition and exercise support, are valuable roles for the family physician.

What do we know about this surgery?

According to the Schroeder:

Complications and adverse effects are lowest with laparoscopic surgery, and vary by procedure and presurgical risk…. Overall, these procedures have a mortality risk of less than 0.5 percent.

Here are some videos of what we are talking about. So what’s the patient experience?

Immediately post op:

Days 7-10: Now, at this stage, I shall only eat 4-6 Tablespoons of food each “meal” and I should have 5-6 meals a day. I can add mashed potatoes, custard, and pudding, but I must be VERY careful to keep it really low sugar and really low fat. Otherwise, my tiny pouch will rebel and make me regret it. Big Fat Blog

After a couple of years:

I had a lap-band. Then I had it removed after 2 years. The restrictions on drinking meant that exercise was difficult. And while I’ve felt emotionally broken for years, those two years were the only time I’ve felt physically broken. The experience was miserable. Big Fat Blog

Years later:

….almost 12 years later, there are still foods I have trouble eating. It still takes me 30 to 45 minutes to eat a meal, even if it’s just a sandwich and some chips. I have to stay away from anything that has a lot of sugar or a lot of grease in it (explosive diarrhea is not something you want to deal with in a public space, take it from me, been there done that). Big Fat Blog

Here are reflections from another blogger:

  • A few months after my surgery I started to have significant hair loss.
  •  It is important to take your vitamins.
  • There have been times that I have forgotten and do drink after I have eaten and when I do this I become quite uncomfortable and this is the occasions I may feel the need to vomit.
  • My taste buds have changed.
  • After I eat most of my meals or have a drink I get a little burppy. Not sure if it’s because I have eaten my meal too quickly (which I do), but it’s a side effect that hasn’t gone away.
  • This is really hard, everybody knows I have had the surgery but what they don’t understand is how little I can eat. I have to remember to ask for a small plate of food and I feel awful when I can’t eat all they gave me.
  • I hit a dark place about 2 weeks in, as I could only drink soups, watered down gatorade, sorbet etc. I really struggled with people eating around me being that I couldn’t eat.
  • I have tuckshop arms, which only recently have started to bother me like this morning when I saw them wobbling when I was drying my hair. It also does get me down a little when I lift my arm up and I notice people noticing my arms. I have an apron fold on my stomach from my pregnancy with the twins. When I have lost all my weight I would like to get the excess skin on my stomach removed. I will only do this when I have lost all my weight though. The organised housewife 

Experience of referral:

A few years later I moved and had to find a new primary care physician. She suggested Weight Loss Surgery… I asked her if she was familiar with WLS research regarding success (lack thereof), mortality rate, etc. After she answered, no, I asked her how she could recommend such a surgery when she was ignorant of its effects. She had no answer. Big Fat blog

So back to the literature (note the dates):

Undergoing laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy induced efficient weight loss and a major improvement in obesity-related comorbidities, with mostly no correlation to percentage of excess weight loss. There was a significant weight regain and a decrease in remission rates of diabetes and, to a lesser extent, other comorbidities over time. JAMA Surg 2015

And

Not all bariatric patients, however, experience mental health gains from weight loss surgery, which is likely attributable to patients’ reactions to common undesired physical outcomes postsurgery: lack of weight loss, weight regain, and undesirable skin changes. Patients’ expectations that bariatric surgery will undoubtedly change their life may also set them up for psychological failure if expectations are not met. Journal of Obesity 2013

Finally we might reflect on the lobotomy as per Gregory Myers:

  1. The surgeon who introduced the world to the lobotomy was awarded the Nobel prize
  2. Some thought it was better than the alternative
  3. There was poor patient follow up
  4. It had significant adverse effects
  5. There was inadequate patient information and consent
  6. It destroyed people’s lives
  7. It was often a rushed procedure
  8. The indications for this invasive surgery were not limited to severe illness
  9. It was replaced by drug treatment

Is history repeating itself? It may by relevant that the global bariatric surgery market size was valued to be over USD 1,300 million in 2014.

Picture by rossodilbolgheri

Why general practitioners are crucial to the economy

The odds of experiencing an event that will descend you briefly into your own private hell are significant.

These odds are much greater than the odds of getting something that requires heroic intervention:

Good news = You are more likely to catch a cold, sprain an ankle or have a runny nose than suffer anything more serious.

Bad news = What happens if you get one of the aforementioned ‘minor illnesses’.  I am living with fractured ribs this week. This is what happens:

  • You are told there is no treatment and no definite recovery period.
  • You can’t tie your own shoe laces, take off your socks or dry your back after a shower.
  • You can’t push open doors.
  • You can’t get out of, our turn over, in bed.
  • You dare not sneeze or pick anything off the ground.
  • You get persistent headaches because of paravertebral muscle strain.

The pain will get worse before it gets better. So at first you might go to the emergency department (ED) because your family will insist. At the ED you will be X-rayed. You will be prescribed analgesia and advised to take time off.  A day or two later in increasing pain you will toy with the idea of going back to hospital just in case they’ve missed something.  The codeine will cause constipation making things worse. Some doctors will advise you to take tramol others will advise against it. A specialist might recommend intercostal nerve blocks (anything looks like a nail when you are armed with a hammer). The cost of getting medical attention will mount. What you will need the most is symptom relief and a greater sense of control. Your only hope is a good GP.

In desperation you might consult YouTube for any useful hints on how to recover. This person has clearly never experienced rib fractures. I hope no medical student thinks this is how to approach the examination of anyone with this condition. On the other hand this person clearly has.

Health economists tell us that the increased costs in the healthcare system are due to unnecessary tests and treatments.

On average, a 50-year-old now is seeing doctors more often, having more tests and operations, and taking more prescription drugs, than a 50-year-old did ten years ago

You are at greater risk of ‘minor illness’ than any other illness. Yet we know that is when we are likely to request tests and treatments in the vain hope it will hasten the recovery. Good GPs  reduce this morbidity as well as the cost of caring for people when time is the only treatment.

This week we launched the Journal of Health Design. The scope of our journal is to support researchers who are developing innovations inspired by the patient experience of healthcare. This was also the week that the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners supported our team to conduct research that aims at supporting GPs in consultations with people with viral infections when antibiotics are not indicated.

Picture by Matt Pelletier

Are we allowing technology to hamper healing?

13866052723_2020820f89_zYou’ve heard it before

I’m at that age doctor when I should have a full body scan. Like it’s being offered here.

or at the very least

Can I have a scan doctor?

When offered radiological tests immediately the public is led to believe that such investigations are necessary. In Australia between 1996 and 2010, total CT scan numbers have increased almost 3 fold. (Medicare Australia, Group Statistics Reports 2010, Report No. 2. Available from here). The number of CT scans is reportedly growing at about 9% each year in Australia. In the USA there are estimated to be 62 million scans per year as compared with about 3 million in 1980 with growing concern about the wisdom of exposing people to increasing levels of radiation.

At the same time the value of most tests carried out is also in doubt. In a study of an academic medical department it was concluded that:

…almost 68% of the laboratory tests commonly ordered…. could have been avoided, without any adverse effect on patient management; this figure corresponds to 2.01 unnecessary tests ordered/patient during each day of their hospitalisation. Miyakis et al

In the context of hospital medicine inappropriate test ordering adds to the cost of healthcare. In primary care there is the additional concern that tests fail to achieve any useful outcome. The patient may experience considerable dissatisfaction with the failure of diagnostic tests to explain their pain and may feel they they are being labelled a malingerer.

Therefore one might pause to reflect before requesting yet another investigation. Physical examination, which arguably obviates the need for many tests has an enormous value to the patient even in the context of advanced cancer.

Most patients (83%) indicated that the overall experience of being examined was highly positive (median score, 4; interquartile range [IQR], 2-5; P ≤ .0001). Patients valued both the pragmatic aspects (median score, 5; IQR, 4-5) and symbolic aspects (median score, 4; IQR, 4-5) of the physical examination. Increasing age was independently associated with a more positive perception of the physical examination (odds ratio, 1.07 per year; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.12 per year; P = .01). Kadakia et al

According to Paul Little and colleagues reporting in the BMJ perceived pressure from patients is a strong independent predictor of whether doctors examine, prescribe, refer, or investigate in primary care. It seems, at least in part that we may be responding to such pressures to order necessary tests. On the other hand our perception of the value of examination may be blunted.  As Professor Little wrote:

The doctors thought, however, there was no or only slight medical need among a significant proportion of those examined (89/580, 15%), given a prescription (74/394, 19%), or referred (27/125, 22%) and among almost half of those investigated (99/216, 46%).

One could argue with the doctors’ impressions of the ‘need’ for medical examination. To some extent it is necessary in every case. We may be losing the sight of the therapeutic effect of the examination as part of effective communication in primary care. There is a need to revitalise our ability to heal. At a time of increasing costs in healthcare examining patients is a relatively low cost intervention with significant potential to improve outcomes.

Picture by COM SALUD

Profiting from vanity- they may be targeting someone you love.

Where I live you’d be forgiven for thinking that you will be reported for child abuse if your teenager has less than perfectly straight teeth. Kids are growing up believing they need to be physically perfect.  So when the first crop of zits appears there is a hasty and often expensive trip to the chemist. Treating acne is a $3 billion industry in the United States alone.

..but i just feel so ugly when i see pretty girls with perfect skin around me.. it just makes me feel terribly disgusting, honestly. like i’m less of a person. it’s not fair. at my age there’s so much pressure to look beautiful constantly. even though i know most people don’t care how good you look a lot of them are secretly judging inside… everyone does it, even me..Nyla

Those in the age group 15-24 account for 7.6%  of consultations in general practice. Significant or life limiting pathology is unlikely in this age group but for many these meetings with their doctor will set the tone for a life long relationship with their main healthcare provider. For young people acne and eczema are the reason for almost one in three consultations with a GP. Sadly it has been reported that some teenagers get a very poor deal when they pluck up the courage to see a doctor:

It’s not that he doesn’t listen … sometimes he doesn’t fully comprehend that he’s talking in a way you can’t understand … it would help if they talked to teenagers. ( As reported by Jacobson et al in the BJGP)

This could be a missed opportunity to forge a relationship with the patient. If you are a doctor it may be worthwhile rehearsing a lucid explanation of common problems presented to you, including and especially acne. There is a bewildering array of opinions on this problem. Indeed the conclusion of research on this topic was that the majority of young people are getting information from non physician sources and there may be a need to evaluate the resources they are using to make sure they are receiving appropriate, helpful information. That includes parents who would rather their teenager would learn to live with her spots and expect you to endorse that view.

For those who want a ‘cure’ the opportunity for to profit from their distress makes them vulnerable to the most unscrupulous practices. $3 billion USD represents a substantial market for lotions, potions and diets that don’t work.

Substantial numbers of those surveyed had ideas about cause, treatment, and prognosis that might adversely affect therapy. Rasmussen and Smith

The truth is acne is a manageable condition, it’s just a matter of finding a treatment that works for an individual. For most people, it may take few attempts at find something that works. For some, over-the-counter topical creams are fine, for others, oral antibiotics or hormonal treatments work better, and yet others only respond to drugs prescribed by a dermatologist, with multiple courses required in relatively rare circumstances. The goal of having clear (or at least totally acceptable) skin is not unreasonable. This is a teachable moment in the interaction with young people.

Picture by Caitlin Regan

Address the patient’s greatest fears ASAP

5418964298_f559aa973b_z

I think my son has meningitis.

I glanced at the boy who was now walking across the room to look more closely at a poster on antenatal care.

I don’t think so was my first thought, followed by thank you for telling me exactly what you are worried about. It’s not always that easy. Often the ‘hidden agenda’ remains just that- hidden. The longer it remains unchallenged the greater its hold. Then it’s much less easily to address head on. Sometimes you get a sense of it from the smell of fear as it comes into the room. Occasionally it’s hidden in a request for curious tests:

Could you check my vitamin levels?

My favorite is those who come for ‘check ups’ and are seemingly asymptomatic. I recommend the paper by Sabina Hunziker and colleagues. They studied 66 cases of people who explicitly requested a ‘check up’. All consults were video recorded and analysed for information about spontaneously mentioned symptoms and reasons for the clinic consultation (“open agendas”) and for clues to hidden patient agendas using the Roter interaction analysis system (RIAS).In RIAS, a cue denotes an element in patient-provider communications that is not explicitly expressed verbally. It includes vague indications of emotions such as anxiety or embarrassment that patients might find difficult to express openly and that prevent the patient from being completely forthcoming about his or her reasons for requesting a consultation. All 66 patients initially declared to be asymptomatic but this was ultimately the case in only 7 out of 66 patients.

Back to the boy with ‘meningitis’. He had a fever and aches and pains. However according to Dr. Google, who mum consulted just before rushing to the surgery, if the child had ‘cold hands’ one of the possibilities is that the child has meningitis.

I examined the child thoroughly and found that he had a mild pyrexia and signs of an upper respiratory tract infection. He was awake, alert and clearly interested in his surroundings. He was persuaded to smile and had no signs of septicemia. As this is a common fear in anxious parents I am prepared with standard advice that might be helpful and outline the way meningitis presents. Something I have encountered in practice.

There are many other fears that are presented in an urgent consult. In 99.99% of cases, they are unfounded. However the opportunity to allay the patient’s fears is also an opportunity to forge a bond that may be of enormous assistance when those fears prove to be well-founded. It may be worth considering how you will respond to patient fears of the many monsters that appear in the dead of night; cancer, heart attack, Kawasaki’s disease and meningitis in particular. Bearing in mind these monsters do occasionally present in the most atypical fashion.

Picture by Pimthida

 

How improving the experience of hospital death can help redesign healthcare

 

The residents always approached my father as if he was a person and there weren’t any divisions between them. They didn’t come in and say, “I’m Doctor so and so.” There wasn’t any kind of separation or aloofness. They would sit right on his bed, hold his hand, talk about their families, his family, golf, and sports. From Steinhauser et al.

The chances are when the times comes you will die in hospital. It may be sudden or it may be expected and either you will die a good death or the experience for you and those who are left to grieve will make a bad situation worse. Charles Garfield put it like this:

A good death is no oxymoron. It’s within everyone’s realm of possibility. We need only realize its potential and prepare ourselves to meet it mindfully, with compassion and courage

John Costello concluded his research on patient experiences of death as follows:

The findings also challenge practitioners to focus attention on death as a process, and to prioritize patients’ needs above those of the organization. Moreover, there is the need for guidelines to be developed enabling patients to have a role in shaping events at the end of their lives. John Costello

Therefore, the needs of the ‘organisation’ may impact adversely on the experience of death. These might include the need to adhere to routines such as ward rounds, meal and medication time on open wards which may make it difficult to cater to the needs of the family when the patient dies.

A good place to start with innovation is to consider what, how and when things go wrong. Costello’s interviews with nurses identified several determinants of a bad death:

  • Sudden, unexpected or traumatic deaths especially soon after admission
  • Death other than on the ward
  • Family not aware of impending death or family conflict a major feature
  • Lack of dignity or respect
  • Diagnosis uncertain

Therefore, the key features are the circumstances surrounding the death. The consequences are far from trivial:

Dying patients with unresolved physical and psychological problems, such as pain, nausea, vomiting or spiritual distress, and who were unresponsive to treatment or nursing care, were invariably regarded as experiencing bad death. John Costello

This begs the question why not prepare for death in every hospital admission especially where death is a less than distant possibility. The majority of hospital deaths occur in those over 75 years of age. How is the team prepared if there is a death on the ward expected or otherwise, whether it’s convenient to the routines or not?

Achieving seven goals appear to mark a ‘good’ death:

  1. The patient should be physically, psycho-socially, and spiritually pain-free
  2. Recognize and resolve interpersonal conflicts.
  3. Satisfy any remaining wishes that are consistent with their present condition.
  4. Review their life to find meaning.
  5. Hand over control to a trusted person, someone committed to helping them have the kind of death they desire.
  6. Be protected from needless procedures that serve to only dehumanize and demean without much or any benefit.
  7. Decide how social and how alert they want to be.

Many of these goals are in the purview of the doctor and her prescription pad, others require all those involved to help prepare for an event that will impact on everyone associated with the patient. Healthcare is now a team effort and nowhere more than at the end of life.

When physical symptoms are properly palliated, patients and families may have the opportunity to address the critical psychosocial and spiritual issues they face at the end of life. Steinhauser et al

The point is if we prepare every hospitalised patient who may conceivably deteriorate and die as if we were preparing them and our units for that experience we will treat all patients with greater dignity. That’s the foundation of good outcomes for healthcare staff and the dying.

Picture by Alyssa L. Miller

Don’t trust data out of context

5331111591_5352e900cd_zIn the drive to solve healthcare problems, it’s tempting to tinker with the essence of what medicine has to offer. When we are trying to give patients answers we often fall back on what we can measure, like blood pressure, cholesterol levels and so on. It’s easy to offer people a number that is a barometer for their health. However it’s just as important to understand our patients and the context in which they seek help. What worries them about their current situation or problem? Can they earn a living whilst they have this problem? How are they coping?

If we rely too much on big data we are failing to recognise the role that the practitioner plays in facilitating the recovery from disease. A fundamental truth is that technical medicine- surgery and drugs have very little to offer most people who seek help. There is plenty of evidence that such interventions may even be harmful. There is no occasion when technical assistance alone will make any difference to a person’s distress. That is not to say that there is no place for surgery or powerful drugs. In most circumstances though it is the interaction between an interested practitioner, who gives their undivided attention, who enables the patient to understand and acknowledge the source of their distress that makes all the difference. The best medicine helps patients to find the resources within themselves to improve their circumstances or alter an unhelpful perspective on a difficult situation. Innovations that enable the patient and the practitioner to arrive at this point sooner rather than later are most likely to make a difference to patients.

Not everything that a healer offers can be replaced by facts and figures, or enhanced by gadgets or gizmos. In fact the true value of the encounter between doctor and patient cannot be audited. Failure to factor this truth into our attempts to innovate will lead to sterile and inevitably harmful efforts to improve the outcomes in healthcare. This is especially true when those innovations are a distraction to either the doctor, the patient or both. How are your attempts to solve problems disrupting the business at hand?

Picture by Lara Lima

There is no curriculum for kindness

For months, my wife had been worried about the mole. I couldn’t see anything wrong with it but then it was on my back and I was peering at it through a mirror. In the end, she put the job of getting it examined by a doctor into my diary and it became ‘urgent and important’.

I decided I’d ask my colleague in the office next door if he could recommend a dermatologist.

Do you want me to take a look?

I hated to impose, it seemed hardly worth wasting a surgeon’s time looking at something I was convinced was benign.

Without a second thought, he bounced out of his chair and headed to his car appearing a moment later with a head-mounted magnifier.

It looks benign. However I have three rules with these things. We remove it if your wife is worried about it, if you are worried about it or if I’m worried about it. It’s a five-minute job. We can’t be sure until it’s sent to the lab. But you know that.

He smiled kindly. It was a small courtesy to a colleague,  but a telling example of how a man you had been a surgeon all his life could still be spontaneously kind. His rule made excellent sense. This behaviour is not in any medical textbook. It’s not recognised as an ‘innovation’ that can improve outcomes. It’s just plain old-fashioned, good-natured thoughtfulness. It doesn’t require a grant or a special piece of equipment or anyone’s approval. It makes all the difference to all of us every day. It’s the sort of thing that speaks of vocation. I’m grateful that my colleague works with me, he is a wonderful communicator and that matters when you are training future doctors.

Picture by British Red Cross

Age, occupation and prognosis may filter what the patient hears

8362704298_693028c937_z

I’m booked in for a check up tomorrow with the doctor who looked after me and called the ambulance so I can thank her in person. My bike doesn’t seem to have a scratch! Tony and Wayne

The experience of an illness, accident or emergency can heighten the trust in a medical practitioner. Primary prevention is more problematic.  People who are asymptomatic and being urged to alter their lifestyle or take antihypertensives may be more dubious:

Well I mean would you trust them with your life? Or would you trust them you know, when you’ve got a bit of a cough? You know, there’s a bit of a difference. You can trust somebody to take a splinter out or whatever but ah, I mean, even if you’ve made some sensible comments, if you’re going to start playing around with anything serious, you know, brain or the heart or whatever, you’d like to know a bit more about it—you’d like to see him in action and…Meyer et al

Three factors appear to influence the attitude; age, socioeconomic status (SES) and prognosis. Our research was conducted with reference to cardiovascular disease. Generalisations in medicine are not safe however these data offered some helpful pointers.

Older patients, lower SES patients and patients with established pathology are more likely to trust, and are less likely to question medical advice. Meyer et al

Our research also suggests that:

Participants who perceived themselves at risk of a poor or uncertain outcome were unlikely to express doubts about medical advice. Meyer et al

Therefore, context is critical when crafting an approach to the patient. Does the patient wish to be involved in decision making or would your presentation of multiple options with the relevant probabilities for each outcome make a bad situation worse? At a time when there is a push towards ‘patient self-management,’ the data suggests that some patients prefer a traditional approach with the doctor recommending a treatment modality. Older people in deprived areas top the list, the demographic that is at highest risk of chronic and complex health conditions. Unfortunately getting this wrong when the patient wants to be more involved may destroy the relationship between patient and clinician.

…he’s always explained—look whatever I’ve gone to see him for he’s explained, he’s gone into details. He, he doesn’t write anything off without doing tests for, for further examinations—whatever. And through the process of elimination as opposed to my previous GP who had the approach of, ‘ah it’s nothing—you’ll be alright’. Meyer et al

We need to understand the business of doctoring as an integral part of designing solutions aiming to optimise patient experience. We need doctors to step up as codesigners. Treatment is often determined locally within the appropriate context rather than a one-size-fits-all. The solution to healthcare challenges starts with having a good General Practitioner whose work is supported by good research in primary care.

Picture by Tony and Wayne

Innovating for one of the climate’s biggest public health challenges

4265056770_b589d0437a_zIn a cohort of U.S. women, we found that sun exposures in both early life and adulthood were predictive of BCC and SCC risks, whereas melanoma risk was predominantly associated with sun exposure in early life. Wu et al

Furthermore according to the editor of Nature in July 2014

It is accepted that sunscreens protect against squamous cell carcinoma, and this work [research] suggests that they also protect against melanoma.

This message is not getting through to those who might be able to influence public opinion

To win the U.S. Open, tennis players must overcome fearsome opponents, grueling matches and searing heat. But for some, none of that causes quite as much angst as the prospect of rubbing on a gob of white lotion. Of all the accessories that players have at their disposal, sunscreen may be their least favorite. Some don’t wear it at all. Some apply it before daytime matches, if somewhat begrudgingly. But nobody seems to like it. Brian Costa and Jim Chairusmi

The ambient temperature in many parts of Australia early this year will be well over 30 degrees with a UV index of 11- in other words, extreme. Intelligent and well-informed young men and women may be found fully exposed to the midday sun and for hours on end. Many will not be wearing sunscreen, a hat or sunglasses. This can be observed on the beaches, on the tennis courts and on the cricket field.

The message to seek protection from harmful UV rays needs to be crafted in the context to which it is being targetted. It needs to take account of the ideas of young people who are resistant to messages that appear to impose limitations on what they can do:

Tennis players tend to sweat profusely, especially during day sessions at the U.S. Open, where high temperatures and humidity are typical. When the heat mixes with sunscreen, the sweat can form a gooey substance that gets into players’ eyes and onto their hands, affecting both their vision and their grip.

We need to understand and adapt to the perspective of those to whom the public health message needs to get through. There may be other ways to deliver the messages that are more potent. Watch these videos:

  1. The sun damages your looks
  2. It can harm your vision

Therefore, within Foggs model, the motivation to seek protection from UV light could be targetted better. Ability to apply sunscreen or wear sunglasses also needs more attention. Technology may have more to offer with more user-friendly products. Equally making the equipment currently on the market more readily available when and where they are needed will also help. Finally, it may be worth considering a trigger for the behaviour. Something that gets motivated people with the ability to perform the action to then act on a regular basis. The recipe for such behaviour is typically the traffic light. Red means stop every time. The teenager who gets on the cricket field with sunglasses and sunscreen in his bag needs to be triggered to wear them without mum or dad’s nagging voice to remind him. The behaviour needs to be anchored to something familiar- e.g. stepping onto the sand or grass and the message delivered at a teachable moment. The trigger of television advert is not enough for behaviours that need to be repeated. There is still scope to develop an effective innovation by an enterprising researcher based on the principles of patient experience design. I hope it is you.

Picture by Colin J