The future of healthcareLearn More

It is time for primary care to enter the triggering business

It has been suggested, some would say demonstrated that doctors know very little about their patients. If you are a doctor could you identify your patient’s partner from a line-up of strangers (other than people you see as a couple)?  Or could you tell without seeing the name on the document if this bank statement belonged to that patient? Or whether that utility bill was from where that person lives? Is this internet search history theirs? Do you know how much they spend on lottery tickets? Alcohol? Vegetables?

A few years ago our team then based in the UK was evaluating an intervention to increase access to general practitioners. If the intervention worked we would have to demonstrate improvement over the course of a whole year. Here’s the thing, we noted that year after year there was a pattern to the demand for same day (emergency) appointments- with definite peaks and troughs. So if the intervention worked it would have to be sustained during both the peaks and the troughs. It did. The data on out-of-hours services exhibited very similar patterns- with definite peaks and troughs and at unexpected times of the year. We could not explain the patterns but noted that when the meteorological office recorded  22 hours or more of sunshine in the week the demand for appointments dropped. Not the prevalence of viral or other community pathogens but sunshine of all things! Okay may it was some factor that we hadn’t modelled in the analysis but there was a definite pattern that we could not immediately explain on the basis of what seemed plausible at the time. We called it the Spring Cleaning Effect– we hypothesised that people in the UK were less likely to attend doctors in general practice when there was a run of sunny days on which to do outdoorsy things. We didn’t anticipate this- nor did clinic managers because the patterns of demand were not used to inform the scheduling of doctors’ on-call rosters. It was clear that they were blind to a phenomenon nobody understood fully.

More recently I reviewed some data on certification for low back pain and noted the pattern that as unemployment rates in a locality increased the rates of certification dropped and then plateaued.

Our team is now investigating similar data from a large employers’ records. We hypothesise that rates of submission of sickness certification will show a sharp drop when vacancy rates fall and other markers of economic health decline. People may be far less likely to take time off sick if they are fearful of upsetting their supervisor. With respect to primary care, it is unlikely that doctors will know everything that impacts on their patient’s choices. Time spent with the patient in discovering these things is unlikely to increase as it comes at a financial cost. Therefore doctors will never fully anticipate all the drivers to patient behaviour. Why does that obese person fail to take action on weight management? Why does this other person take ‘medication holidays’ when they need to take the treatment consistently to benefit? Why does the next person refuse to have an X-ray? Why is there a rush of people with relatively minor conditions demanding appointments this week and not last?

Some drivers lead people to behave in unexpected ways as I have commented here previously. Not only that but as Mullainathan and Shafir have postulated people are often unable or perhaps unwilling to follow doctor’s advice. In the end, the best we can hope is to trigger the relevant behaviour in people who are already motivated and seek teachable moments to inspire people to act for their benefit. Primary care may be more about recognising or fishing for opportunities and much less ‘educating’ for change. Such triggers need to fit within the final moments of a 15-minute consult. The work to develop and evaluate such triggers is only beginning. Counselling patients to stop smoking will yield 1:20 quits in a year, showing them a trigger (in less than 5 minutes) that appeals to their vanity results in 1:7 quits. A substantial number (1:5) of obese people will lose weight in 6 months if they are shown what difference that would make to their appearance without having to be extensively counselled on diet and exercise.

Picture by Aimee Rivers

Much of what’s wrong with healthcare is in the consulting room

It’s not that complicated. Not really. So where do you look for pathology? Inspection, palpation, percussion and auscultation. How does it look, how does it feel, how does it sound and what do you hear when you know where to listen closely. I’m talking about healthcare. Take a helicopter ride through your business.

Access

What is the route to your service? Where is the delay? How long do people wait in the waiting room? How do you know? What do you know about the people who use your service even before they are seated in your waiting room?

Greeting

What happens when people call or arrive in person? What message is conveyed?

Welcome we’ll do our best to help you today OR you are lucky we are ‘fitting you in’.

Just stand there- I’m dealing with someone on the phone.

We have no time- go complain to the manager/politician/ bureaucrat-consider yourself drafted to the cause.

Hold the line. We are dealing with something far more important but your call is really important to us so just listen to how good we are as conveyed by our prerecorded message.

Associated with that is what is perceived about your attitude that is not verbalised?

Look at ALL these posters and the many ways you can be helping yourself instead of wasting our time.

People vomit and pee while they wait so the seats have to be cleaned with detergent. Plastic is the best option.

If you want a drink go buy one at a cafe.

We rely on donations for our toys and magazines- we don’t have to provide anything OK? Now if you don’t like the stuff just watch Dr. Phil.

What do you mean you have been waiting a couple of hours? This isn’t McDonalds now take a ticket, sit down, shut up and wait. And turn off your phone so you can hear the old lady at the desk who has an embarrassing problem.

Communication

How long is the meeting with the provider? How does that meeting unfold? What is conveyed during the meeting?

Welcome- I’m so sorry you are not well. Tell me what happened? OR I haven’t got long what do you want exactly, spit it out be quick about it I need to get on with the next guy. Didn’t you see the queue out there?

I’m the important one around here- you are lucky I’ve chosen to be here today. Let me tell you about my holiday, my kids, my new car. It’s fascinating really!

Room 5. Quickly. Never mind my name.

Test/ Referral and Prescription

What action is taken at the consult and are you confident that is the best possible action?

I don’t have time for talk- have this test and take another day off to see me next week.

I don’t have time for you to take off your umpteen layers- go have a scan.

The rep told me this works- I only have to write a script.

If you want to get better take my medicine/advice/ referral or get lost.

What medicine do you want? How do you spell that? Tell me slowly I’m writing it down on your script.

Outcome

What proportion of people takes your advice/medicine/test? How many people stopped smoking? How many were triggered to lose weight? How many are addicted to prescribed medicines? How many were prescribed treatment or tests that were not indicated? Where’s your data? What are your plans for dealing with this?

Team

To what extent can you say that when people transition to another healthcare professional either on site or elsewhere that the relevant information follows them? Is everyone on the same page with the same patient?

All of this matters. All of it. Some of you can fix tomorrow. No need to wait for another round of healthcare reform. No one said it was easy. And whatever their business the best don’t compromise.  A lot of what can be fixed in healthcare takes place behind the closed doors of the consulting room.

Picture by Daniele Oberti

Junk used to wallpaper doctors’ offices

Of all the things doctors can do in their practice they can certainly choose what to display on their walls. In 1994 a group of researchers reported:

To determine whether patients read and remembered health promotion messages displayed in waiting rooms, 600 patients in a UK general practice were given a self-complete questionnaire. Two notice-boards carried between 1 to 4 topics over four study periods. Three-hundred and twenty-seven (55%) of subjects responded. Twenty-two per cent recalled at least one topic. Increasing the number of topics did not in crease the overall impact of the notice-boards. The numbers of patients recalling a topic remained constant, but increasing the number of topics reduced the number remembering each individual topic. Patients aged over 60 years were less likely to recall topics, but waiting time, gender and health professional seen had no effect on results. Very few patients (<10%) read or took health promotion leaflets. Wicke et al

It would appear that the notices are basically used as wallpaper. They do not seem to serve any other useful purpose. Researchers suggest that the design of such ‘community communication channels’ requires further thought:

Our results highlight how they are used for content of local and contextual relevance, and how cultures of participation, personalization, location, the tangible character of architecture, access, control and flexibility might affect community members’ level of engagement with them. Fortin et al

Essentially the role of the notice board with its myriad of posters and leaflets is to ‘sell and inform’ not to decorate and distract. They sell ‘health’ or services related to health. Vaccinations, antenatal care, weight loss, smoking cessation, early diagnosis, screening, the list is endless. They might also inform about practice policy. The notice board, or as it often seems almost every available space on the walls is used in a vain attempt to ‘communicate’ with people. But this sort of communication is carefully choreographed in the retail and service industry:

Businesses like gas stations and banks regularly provide information about the availability and price of particular items, such as gas, convenience items, loans, and savings certificates. The display of this information plays a central role in these companies’ business strategies for increasing traffic and sales. Indeed, the value of a corner or other highly-visible location rests largely on the ability to use signs to inform passers-by about the availability of a business’ goods and services. University of Cincinnati Economics Center

The way these notices are displayed can have an impact on the bottom line of the business:

In conclusion, exterior electronic message boards offer business a lift in store sales performance and generate a relatively quick return on investment. While the overall 2.12 percent lift in sales is modest, in a high-volume store with low installation costs, the investment returns to using this technology can be significant. University of Cincinnati Economics Center

Your bank, department store, hairdresser does not stick everything they have on their walls and hope for the best. The walls in a doctors’ premises are high-value real estate, not a back street that can be pasted with whatever junk is sent by whoever wants to get attention until the material becomes dog-eared or torn. The key is to focus on ‘content of local and contextual relevance’. However, in the end, the wall space should prepare the patient for the consultation. It is in the consultation that the advice can be tailored to the patient and as Wicke and colleagues concluded in 1994:

More modern methods of communication such as electronic notice-boards or videos could be used. However, the waiting room might best function not as an area where a captive audience can be bombarded with health promotion messages, but rather as a place for relaxation before consulting a health professional, making patients more receptive to health advice in the consultation. Wicke at al.

Would it really do any harm to jettison this confetti altogether?

Picture by Bala Sivakumar

Some things in medicine need to be modernised

Many of our experiences in life have changed beyond recognition. Shopping for example- you can now choose whatever you want and have those goods delivered to your door. When you shop in person you can check out your own purchases and find out the nutritional value of the food you buy by scanning the barcodes on the packets using your phone. You need never visit a book shop or a library ever again and you can get all the music and films you might ever want delivered to your living room. You can even hear what other people think of these things before you buy.

You can hail a taxi, book a flight and find accommodation where ever you are going on holiday without getting off your couch.  You can draft a review of that taxi or accommodation as well as discover what others have thought of the same good or service. With minimum effort you can change the way these things flow into your life so radically that your grandma would hardly recognize it as ‘shopping’. You need never do to a post office again and you can even pay your taxes on line. While the way these things are brought into our lives have changed, we are still buying food, reading books, travelling and watching films as we did decades ago.

Similarly you make an appointment with a doctor from the comfort of your chair. You can even have a video consultation. In some places you can have the order for your medicines delivered to a pharmacist so that you pick it up on the way home or have it delivered to where ever you happen to be. For some conditions you can choose to see someone other than your doctor. Some supermarkets now stock some of the medicines that were only prescribed by doctors. However that experience is not the same as visiting a doctor face to face. That experience is a watered down version of what was available to your grandma. Your grandma’s doctor met her in person, he or she touched her and knew about her life. He might even have visited her at home. In many ways your grandma had it much better than you do even though she had to get herself across town to the clinic. It was even called the drug doctor and it was as potent as anything that has ever been distilled in a lab.

On the other hand the experience when you see a doctor in person is the same as it was decades ago. You still ‘take a ticket’ and wait with everyone else.  The receptionist still treats you like a number.  You still have a very short time with the doctor sitting in the big chair, in the same busy office surrounded by paperwork and dog eared posters. If anything the doctor might even just look at a computer screen throughout your visit. How could the experience be improved? What happens in every other service where you might still need to see someone in person? Your hairdresser, masseuse, your manicurist. How much do you value those experiences? How could seeing a doctor in person be modernized but retain its core value in our lives? How would we convey our gratitude if the experience met with our approval?

Picture by Francisco Osorlo

 

Aren’t general practitioners already working hard enough Mrs May?

Right on cue in 2017 one government has made public pronouncements that the healthcare service is failing people because doctors, and specifically general practitioners, are not working hard enough. And their prime minister is prepared to penalise them:

Mrs May wants GPs to provide services 8-8pm, seven days a week, unless they can prove there’s no demand.

Her three point plan would see extra funding for docs slashed unless they provide weekend and evening appointments when patients need them– not when they offer them.

Practices getting extra cash for opening outwith core 8-6.30pm hours during the week will also be asked to expand online services. Lynn Davidson

It is as if the health of the nation can only be managed in one way- increase the number of people who consult a GP. It implies that the quality of those consultations couldn’t possibly suffer because tired doctors are forced to work longer hours. The government appears to be armed with a hammer and to them, everything looks like a nail. If these are the public pronouncements of the UK government, and there is a GP shortage how are they making a career in general practice an attractive option? Five experts presented their views on the subject of the current crisis in another article in a different national newspaper:

Nursing: Poor strategic decisions and budget cuts to care services have exacerbated pressures on emergency care.

Think Tank: More people attending hospitals and more of them are older and sicker. In many hospitals, beds are fully occupied, making it difficult to admit patients and causing waiting times in A&E to lengthen

Medical association: Demand is so great that hospitals are now full all year around, meaning there is no spare capacity to deal with a seasonal spike in demand

General practice: Cold weather inevitably brings more illness. But while we hear a lot about the crisis in our A&E departments, the explosion in demand for GPs is being overlooked or ignored.

Emergency medicine: It is not inappropriate patient attendances that are causing this; it is simply the volume of ill, elderly people made more complex with the wide range of existing medical conditions many suffer from.

The answer according to each expert is to ask for more money. But there are hints of an understanding that there is a more fundamental problem:

More money on its own will not help when the current system is fundamentally flawed and needs to be redesigned from scratch. Admissions should be prevented through early intervention and supporting people in their homes by anticipating their needs before they experience a crisis. Chris Ham

If that is so what does a ‘redesigned from scratch’ health service look like? In the UK there has been reform of the National Health Service by every government in the past thirty years. We have known about the coming tsunami of chronic and complex conditions for decades. How then is it that at least one developed country has woken up to this nightmare seemingly unprepared?  What happens in the interaction that matters the most- the one involving only two people- the health practitioner and the patient? What is needed to prevent a crisis in the patient’s life? In a society where autonomy is a fundamental right who makes the choices that lead to the need for medical intervention? How can we redesign the system so that we are turbo-charging the very interaction that has the most potential to prevent the crisis? It surely isn’t to ask doctors to work hours that are unsustainable.

Picture by Damian Gadal

Perspective is crucial when considering changes in healthcare policy

It was summer of 2010 in Australia. I had been working hard in the garden one Sunday afternoon. Feeling the need for a little mindless entertainment I suggested to our then 14 year old that we might rent a sci-fi movie. It was around 7pm and  getting dark. My son jumped into the car beside me and we took off toward the video shop. That’s when I noticed that the car headlights were far too dim. I turned on full beam- but it didn’t help. I ranted for a good five minutes about how difficult it was going to be to get a mechanic to look at the car so close to Christmas. I was also a bit put out that our teenager was showing no concern for my predicament. At this point he quietly reached across and took my sunglasses off my face.

There. Problem solved dad.

I learned something that day not least what it would cost me if that story was not be retold to his brothers.

I love the work of Deana McDonagh and Joyce Thomas, especially their thinking on empathic design. Deana and Joyce begin their sessions on empathic design by inviting participants to try on their designer glasses- the ones that demonstrate what it must feel like to have tunnel vision. They’ve written about it in the Australasian Medical Journal. I keep those glasses in my office to remind myself and visitors of the valuable insights they offer but also as a treasured momento of a fun workshop generously organised by a brilliant team.

Their work came to mind later when we were investigating the attitude to self-management of a condition that is progressive and for which there is no cure. Patients and doctors in an Asian setting were interviewed. We recorded poignant stories about the impact of this condition on people’s lives- resulting in social isolation, self loathing and a need to feel supported by a health practitioner:

Both patients and doctors were against the adoption of self-management strategies. This is contrary to recommendations for the management of COPD by many studies and guidelines. However, another study has similarly shown that self-management skills were not rated as important by patients. Furthermore, the psychosocial impact of their disease such as fear limited their ability to manage their own symptoms. A lack of knowledge may also contribute to their dependence on doctors and health care providers.

We concluded:

In reality, patients have to conduct self-management daily and it is not feasible for physicians to provide all of the management needs that patients have during their day-to-day lives. Therefore, self-management remains an aspect of overall COPD care. However, it should not be the only focus and future interventions should also examine ways to improve access to health care.

On reflection we noted something similar with patients in Australia. Those who had an established medical condition were much more likely to ‘trust’ their doctor than those who were not currently unwell or those from higher socioeconomic groups. Innovating requires the ability to see people as heterogenous having very different perceptions on the need to be in charge of their own health, perceptions that are liable to change with circumstances. I also wonder if policy makers consider what it must be like to implement their big ideas from this perspective:

Picture by Redfishingboat

Why doctors say ‘it depends’.

She looked harassed. She flung herself into the chair.

I’ve just about had enough. This cold is driving me mad. I’m coughing all day. Nothing helps. I’m still working for that pig of a man and we are short staffed this winter. I’m not sleeping at night. The kids are all down with this bug and my husband is on night shift. I can’t go on like this.

She left with a prescription for amoxycillin and a seven-day course of hypnotics. She also agreed to come back the following week to report on her progress. The consultation included a conversation about the natural history of viral illnesses and advice to defer the antibiotics, a discussion about her job as a reluctant telemarketer who left school without any qualifications and how to promote restful sleep. The only part of the consult that could be easily audited were the prescription data. The ‘real’ issue was not a microbe it was the milieu.

It is possible to publish papers in prestigious journals demonstrating that clinicians deviate from the evidence base. The list of misdemeanours is not insubstantial:

If you were a clinician you might say:

I never do that.

In which case you might reasonably be asked to outline your goals for consultations. If we accept that it is to be celebrated that people are free to make choices good or bad then we must accept that people smoke, eat more than they need, work in occupations that make them miserable or under bosses who are tyrants. They may choose to remain in abusive relationships or be addicted to drugs, alcohol, pornography or gambling. They are free to make choices but they must also live with the consequences of those choices. Eventually in most cases people will consider alternatives. The role of the clinician is to try to make that sooner rather than later whilst keeping channels of communication open.

The clinician advocates for the patient. In which case the answer to the question ‘would you do this’ is more likely to be:

It depends on the circumstances

You aim ‘never’ to cause harm. To avoid that which will diminish the patient’s choices by engendering physical or psychological adverse outcomes. Technological medicine can and does harm. However what is seldom reported is how the practitioners of the art of medicine help people to cope with life, not just today or tomorrow but in the longer term. That precludes slavery to ‘evidence’ that was never indicated for the very specific circumstances in which a person presents on one occasion. Compassion is not weakness. There is a narrative behind decisions in practice and simply reporting data does not present the whole story.

Picture by Vishweshwar Saran Singh

Profiting from vanity- they may be targeting someone you love.

Where I live you’d be forgiven for thinking that you will be reported for child abuse if your teenager has less than perfectly straight teeth. Kids are growing up believing they need to be physically perfect.  So when the first crop of zits appears there is a hasty and often expensive trip to the chemist. Treating acne is a $3 billion industry in the United States alone.

..but i just feel so ugly when i see pretty girls with perfect skin around me.. it just makes me feel terribly disgusting, honestly. like i’m less of a person. it’s not fair. at my age there’s so much pressure to look beautiful constantly. even though i know most people don’t care how good you look a lot of them are secretly judging inside… everyone does it, even me..Nyla

Those in the age group 15-24 account for 7.6%  of consultations in general practice. Significant or life limiting pathology is unlikely in this age group but for many these meetings with their doctor will set the tone for a life long relationship with their main healthcare provider. For young people acne and eczema are the reason for almost one in three consultations with a GP. Sadly it has been reported that some teenagers get a very poor deal when they pluck up the courage to see a doctor:

It’s not that he doesn’t listen … sometimes he doesn’t fully comprehend that he’s talking in a way you can’t understand … it would help if they talked to teenagers. ( As reported by Jacobson et al in the BJGP)

This could be a missed opportunity to forge a relationship with the patient. If you are a doctor it may be worthwhile rehearsing a lucid explanation of common problems presented to you, including and especially acne. There is a bewildering array of opinions on this problem. Indeed the conclusion of research on this topic was that the majority of young people are getting information from non physician sources and there may be a need to evaluate the resources they are using to make sure they are receiving appropriate, helpful information. That includes parents who would rather their teenager would learn to live with her spots and expect you to endorse that view.

For those who want a ‘cure’ the opportunity for to profit from their distress makes them vulnerable to the most unscrupulous practices. $3 billion USD represents a substantial market for lotions, potions and diets that don’t work.

Substantial numbers of those surveyed had ideas about cause, treatment, and prognosis that might adversely affect therapy. Rasmussen and Smith

The truth is acne is a manageable condition, it’s just a matter of finding a treatment that works for an individual. For most people, it may take few attempts at find something that works. For some, over-the-counter topical creams are fine, for others, oral antibiotics or hormonal treatments work better, and yet others only respond to drugs prescribed by a dermatologist, with multiple courses required in relatively rare circumstances. The goal of having clear (or at least totally acceptable) skin is not unreasonable. This is a teachable moment in the interaction with young people.

Picture by Caitlin Regan

Why people will sack a plumber but won’t sue their doctor

Everyday somebody somewhere summons a plumber. The drain is blocked, the boiler isn’t working, there’s a leak under the sink. The problem is obvious the solution is technical and everyone knows when the job is done. If it’s not fixed asap the plumber is sacked.

That’s rarely what it’s like in medicine. Not everything is a blockage or a break. Not everything can be fixed by sitting quietly with a tool box and following the instructions in the manual.

Many of the commonest problems in healthcare don’t have an easy fix.

  1.  The pain of ‘tennis elbow’ can last for months despite treatment

Patients with tennis elbow can be reassured that most cases will improve in the long term when given information and ergonomic advice about their condition. Bassett et al.

2. Plantar warts don’t always respond to cryotherapy

Little evidence exists for the efficacy of cryotherapy and no consistent evidence for the efficacy of all the other treatments reviewed. Gibbs et al

3. Lung cancer is incurable in most cases

Lung cancer is the main cancer in the world today, whether considered in terms of numbers of cases (1.35 million) or deaths (1.18 million), because of the high case fatality (ratio of mortality to incidence, 0.87). Parkin et al. 

4. Anti hypertensives aren’t guaranteed to prevent stroke

Our analysis indicated that the absolute benefits of antihypertensive therapy depended on BP as well as the presence or absence of additional cardiovascular disease risk factors and the presence or absence of preexisting clinical cardiovascular disease or target organ damage. Ogden et al

5. Mild depression can be hard to treat

The magnitude of benefit of antidepressant medication compared with placebo increases with severity of depression symptoms and may be minimal or nonexistent, on average, in patients with mild or moderate symptoms. Fournier et al 

6. There is no cure for the common cold ( You don’t need a link for this)

These and most other problems in healthcare cannot be ‘fixed’. They can be diagnosed and they can be ‘managed’ but they can’t be fixed in the way that faulty plumbing can be fixed. Therefore that queue of people in the waiting room is saying something more than ‘I’m here to be fixed.’ Patients are saying:

  1. I am in pain
  2. I am anxious
  3. I am unhappy
  4. I am bored
  5. I am angry
  6. I am confused
  7. I am lonely
  8. I don’t like my job
  9. I can’t pay my bills
  10. I need tablets or surgery

The job of the doctor is to work out which and then to fix what can be fixed and help the patient to live with the rest until their perspective or their circumstances change.

  1. Most people won’t take their tablets as prescribed.

    Because non-compliance remains a major health care problem, high quality research studies are needed to assess these aspects and systematic reviews are required to investigate compliance-enhancing inteventions. Let us hope that the need will be met by 2031. Vermeire et al 

  2. Most people won’t benefit substantially from health promotion advice.

Exercise-referral schemes have a small effect on increasing physical activity in sedentary people. The key challenge, if future exercise-referral schemes are to be commissioned by the NHS, is to increase uptake and improve adherence by addressing the barriers described in these studies. Williams et al

3. Most people get better in spite of treatment and not because of it.

Disease mongering can include turning ordinary ailments into medical problems, seeing mild symptoms as serious, treating personal problems as medical, seeing risks as diseases, and framing prevalence estimates to maximise potential markets. Moynihan et al

But then most people will be deeply grateful to their family doctor because they don’t have to respond a certain way to be treated with respect and they don’t expect a ‘cure’ and won’t ask for their money back when things don’t work out. The doctor’s role is to be there, to encourage, to educate, to accept and to walk with their patient through all the challenges that life has to offer.

Picture by Vicki

Doctor now that my ears are older I can hear you so much better

He was much more willing to listen than the twenty nine year old who was only interested in his sprained ankle. The attitude that millennials consider themselves invincible might explain it. Dave on the other hand wanted a certificate for work. Bit of a headache that morning. Didn’t go to work.

So, we got talking. He coaches a local football team. Now 50 can’t keep up with the young blokes on the field. Can still drink ten pints of beer on Saturday night at the club but most other nights happy to settle for two and some nights doesn’t drink at all. He snores. His trouser size gone up to 36 for the first time ever. Feels too stiff and breathless to do any real exercise. His blood pressure is borderline though be feels well enough.

Just under 1 million Australians were born between 1962 and 1966. Even though birthdays at each decade are usually marked by a special celebration, those for 50 are often unusually large. Being fifty is a bid deal.

It is in their 50’s, for example, that most people first think of their lives in terms of how much time is left rather than how much has passed. This decade more than any other brings a major reappraisal of the direction one’s life has taken, of priorities, and, most particularly, how best to use the years that remain. NY Times

  • 50 year olds are now officially “middle aged” technically ‘Generation X’.
  • Retirement benefits are only going to be available when they reach 67 and the money may have to last another 20-30 years.
  • At 50, many couples still have kids in the nest, with educations to be financed, teaching them to drive with attendant expenses , and, perhaps, weddings and helping with house purchase.
  • They may have parents in their 70s and 80s. They are watching mum and dad and their worries about healthcare and long term care expenses.
  • At 50 the majority of people are over weight or obese, the risk of hypertension begins to rise at this age, some men suffer erection dissatisfaction, many may start to have problems seeing clearly at close distances, especially when reading and working on the computer, the prevalence of hearing loss ranges from 20 to 40 percent. Things just don’t work like they used to!

Gen X has to stay healthy because in this economic climate early retirement is not an option. Within this context Dave and I began the work of focusing on his physical well being. The conversation was much more satisfying. This ‘teachable moment’ allowed us to engage in some simple strategies- reducing portion size, drinking less, taking up gentle exercise and keeping an eye on his blood pressure. Now Dave is earnest in his desire to invest in his health. That’s a good thing because at 50 one in 15 men will have heart disease by the time he is 60 one in four men will have developed that condition. Now is the time to invest. For his sake if not for the economy.

The average age of GPs in Australia is also about 50. We will make the journey together because that’s what general practice is all about. No gadget, gizmo or app was required to forge the connection, no research grant or policy. Just doing what we are trained to do.

Picture by Rene Gademann