Tag Archives: creative thinking

You don’t need permission to begin innovating

imageLast weekend I spent four hours in the air sitting bolt upright crammed next to a fidget on a budget airline. The plane was full of sunburnt youngsters flying back from Bali. Years from now they’ll turn up at the doctors convinced that a mole has changed. Sadly malignant melanoma is the commonest malignancy in this part of the world.

Maybe much sooner they’ll be worried that the insect bite on their shoulders is infected. Spots, sores, moles if I had a cent every time someone wanted reassurance about one of those I’d be doing well. I’m sure many of my colleagues would agree that it would be great to have a reliable way to keep an eye on skin lesions that change when the doctor isn’t there to inspect them. It’s also hard to look between your shoulder blades. On the other hand the doctor in me wouldn’t want you to use your phone to make a diagnosis, it has been shown that technology can’t do better than a doctor with a good eye. Nonetheless we need something to track changes in our skin, to alert us if things aren’t looking the same. It would also we helpful to have a record of lesion changes to show when we turn up at the clinic.

Taking photos on a smart phone might help but tracking symptoms and measuring changes in the appearance of something that might need to be removed is a good idea. iMockApp is a free app that enables anyone to create wireframes. I used it on my iPad mini (on that flight from Bali) to develop the idea for an app that could monitor skin lesions. Of course it would need a lot more work before it was made available to the public, but it was a start and spending time on the idea stopped me reaching across to strangle my fellow passenger who had just managed to punch me, accidentally I think, in the side.

The point is that as an innovator you are rarely without the tools to create—diaries, iPads, laptops, note books, napkins, pens, pencils, whatever. You don’t need a whiteboard, a ‘team’, a budget, grant or a mandate from the ‘boss’ to create something new. The world appears divided into two simple typologies- creators and consumers. Will you wait for someone to give you the permission to innovate, or have you taken out pen and paper and begun sketching your design already?

See demand in context and respond creatively

9645066390_babd98c3f1_zHello Jill, Oh, I’m sorry I have no appointments to offer you today. the doctors are all fully booked. If your son has a fever try him with some paracetamol and call back on Friday when I might be able to squeeze him in with Dr. Jones. Ok, bye.

Many years ago I overheard this conversation in my reception. Our receptionist giving medical advice without any qualifications. The surgery was over booked. She was harassed, doctors were grumpy and the patients were being turned away without being assessed by anyone.

We noticed that there was a seasonal pattern to this demand for appointments. Most doctors were aware of this trend because there were specific weeks of the year when they avoided taking holidays. Our reception staff kept meticulous colour coded records of such ‘same day’ appointments. When we entered this data on a statistical database there could be no doubt of a seasonal pattern with definite peaks and troughs. What’s more, we could predict the demand for ‘same day urgent appointments’ with reasonable confidence. At this point, it may be important to stress that doctors in the UK are paid a ‘capitation fee’ for serving patients. That means they are paid an annual fee no matter how many times they see the patient.

Understanding that people have a fundamental desire to talk to the decision maker, we settled on the notion of putting the doctor in charge of making the appointment. Patients who requested a ‘same day’ appointment were offered a telephone consultation with a general practitioner initially. Not with a nurse, as happened in some practices, but with their doctor. We believed patients wanted to speak with a medical practitioner, not because the advice they received was necessarily better than that given by another member of the team, but because people in distress want a doctor. Whatever the reason it worked. Important policy makers noticed. Doctors could deal with most requests within a couple of minutes, offer a ‘same day’ slot or something else without the need for a face-to-face appointment. We calculated a 40% reduction in demand for such appointments. Patients loved it, reception staff loved it too (no more arguments about lack of appointments with irate patients) and doctors found themselves in control of their workload. What’s more, we could prove that this simple intervention worked from the impact on longitudinal seasonal trend.

By allowing patients to speak to their doctor when they felt they couldn’t wait our practice chose to treat this small minority of patients differently to those who were happy to make a routine appointment. We acknowledged that these patients had a need that warranted a creative solution. Perhaps you have a group of patients who would benefit from being treated differently too? What is the context in which they seek help? The tired mother with a fevered child does not have the same needs as the young professional who requires a convenient appointment to obtain a prescription for the contraceptive pill. Both might seek an urgent appointment.

Picture by Marjan Lazerveski