Putting the patient first is not just good medicine, it’s good business

Primary healthcare is mostly organised as if all patients had the same needs. Patients who have a chronic illness who are repeat visitors and those with significant risk factors for future disease, are expected to fit into a system that is designed to meet the needs of someone with urgent and temporary illness. The current system is designed as if it doesn’t really matter which doctor consults them or what is known about their needs.

These are the facts:

1. Each week, there are 1,700 new cases of dementia in Australia; approx. one person every 6 minutes.

2. Cardiovascular disease affects one in six Australians

3. In 2011/12,4.6 million Australians(32%)aged 18years and over had high blood pressure (systolic or diastolic blood pressure is ≥140/90 mmHg or taking medication). Of these, more than two thirds (68%) had uncontrolled or unmanaged high blood pressure (not taking medication), representing 3.1 million adult Australians.

4. 1 in 2 Australian men and 1 in 3 Australian women will be diagnosed with cancer by the age of 85.

In some cases patients are expected to make appointments at a time and place that suits the practitioner. They might be seen for as little as 10 minutes and can feel that their questions and concerns have been addressed. The consequence is that both the doctor and the patient become frustrated.

The clinician complains about workload while the patient seeks alternative ways to meet their needs. There is published evidence that patients with chronic illnesses have significant unmet needs that impact on their quality of life.

The lean innovator knows that the future success of healthcare depends on serving the needs of those who are likely to need to consult a doctor many times in coming years. These patients need to live life despite pathology and to care for others even when they are not feeling their best. The person with enduring health problems also needs to believe that their doctor knows them, understands their perspective and has their best interests at heart.

In the business world such a loyal customer is prized. The business strives to make them feel valued. Great businesses constantly reinvent themselves and look for new ways to ensure that the customer is happy with the service on offer. It takes relatively little to satisfy the patient in a primary healthcare setting. We know, but sometimes forget, that what the patient craves most of all is their doctor’s undivided attention. Like a customer in any other business our patients want to feel that they matter.

We don’t need a department or a huge budget to innovate, because as both business owners and doctors we have the authority and insight to redesign how the patient feels from the moment they walk through the door and at every stage before and after their appointment.

If research has taught us anything it is that the fundamental need in healthcare is for their doctor to have good communication skills. Without that foundation nothing that technology can do for the patient will ever be good enough. Every touchpoint of the system needs to reflect the experience in the consulting room and should say to the patient—we know and care about you.

What is the most important thing you do for the people you serve? Do they get a sense of that from the moment they look for your help?

2 thoughts on “Putting the patient first is not just good medicine, it’s good business”

  1. So it seems that the most important touchpoint for patients is the consultation and the communication with their doctor. Where are the other touch points for a patient accessing general practice ? (i) Making an appointment (ii) arriving at the practice (iii) the consultation (iv) back to reception (for booking or payment). Any others ? How do patients feel at each of these touch points ? Mapping patient emotions at touch points is an extremely useful tool to redesigning and improving care.

  2. Thanks Paresh,
    Yes that’s it. Those are really important touch points- also how you feel when you telephone the practice. I telephoned a practice today and their opening message was- ‘if you think you have a medical emergency then put the phone down and dial 000’. Perfectly sensible advice but it gives the impression that the practice is working in a war zone. It says we are already working very hard without having to argue with you about an urgent appointment. Not how it feels when you talk to the doctors and nurses who work there. Then there’s this point at which you need a doctors signature on a form or calling for the results of tests. All too often we make people feel like they are interrupting someone’s tea break in these circumstances.

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