Please don’t ask for my time as refusal may offend

In an article from the Economist, the authors advise that we appear to perceive ourselves as short of time. Every minute of the day can be filled ‘doing’ something or several things simultaneously, often badly. We are also increasingly wedded to the demands of our mobile devices. People spend time texting while eating, driving and even on the loo. In fact it is estimated that we spend one third of our waking hours interacting with our phone.

In an experiment carried out at the University of Toronto, two different groups of people were asked to listen to the same passage of music. Before the song, one group was asked to gauge their hourly wage. The participants who made this calculation ended up feeling less happy and more impatient while the music was playing. Participants reported experiencing greater impatience while listening to the music when prompted to think about their time in terms of money.

This has some important resonance in healthcare where practitioners who earn a living through fee for service may, and often do, become impatient about engaging with researchers or academics. This is a significant problem because in countries where primary care is the first port of call for most people we desperately need research to ensure that the service offered is both evidence based and cost effective. But what is the order priority: appointments with patients, results of tests, administrative paperwork, continuing medical education, family commitments, surveys or recruitment to research? There is an opportunity cost to all of these activities.

Research in primary care is challenging not least because as has been observed repeatedly it is very difficult to recruit participants to trials in primary care. Practitioners are not funded by the paymaster to do research. Costing the recruitment to adequately compensate for the time taken to seek informed consent is prohibitive and the medical defense organisations do not indemnify doctors to do research.

Therefore, it is often if not almost always, very challenging to conduct randomised clinical trials in that setting. Other methodologies, such as prospective observational studies may be more likely to yield data whilst at the same time acknowledging that this would not be classed as level one evidence. Nonetheless, we need to work within a paradigm in which neither patient nor practitioner is likely to participate or if they do attrition is substantial and threaten the validity and generalisability of the data.

We need more creative ways to test hypotheses and collect data in primary care. Methods that capture data from a substantial number of representative¬†participants. Methods that generate a minimum disruption to the business of doctoring. Traditional research approaches are failing or are only really possible where doctors and patients have unlimited funded time. I don’t know where that is, meantime remain sceptical about results of trials that appear to have recruited and retained thousands of participants but where the practices were involved in a significant effort to recruit to research. In that scenario somebody has paid, always ask who and why.

Picture by M01229

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