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Healthcare will do better when Joe accepts that he is in trouble

There is nothing especially remarkable about Joe. At 49 he works as an administrator for a company in the city. He walks to work from the station having taken a train from the suburbs. He weighs 78Kgs and is 170cm tall (BMI 27). To stay that way he needs to consume no more than 1900 calories per day. He has a bowl of cereal for breakfast, a  panini sandwich for lunch and a home cooked dinner with a glass of wine. That’s about 1900 calories. Joe isn’t inspired at work but he earns a reasonable living. They bought a new car last year and Joe is tied to a hefty car loan, his wife Bridgette gave up her job as a nurse when they had their children ten years ago. They now have three children under 10. The youngest has asthma but he seems so much better since he was put on a steroid inhaler. Joe and Bridgette have had their ups and downs. They worry about money.  Mostly they work hard and are doing their best to raise their boys. At the weekend Joe goes to a football match but since his mid-twenties doesn’t play any sport. With the kids doing sport and music lessons there isn’t time. Joe has never smoked a cigarette.

During the week Joe goes for coffee with his colleagues at 10.30 every morning. He also enjoys a small muffin. Then he has a banana at 2 pm and a couple of small biscuits while he is watching television in the evening. He doesn’t think too much about it. He is consuming 500 calories more than he needs per day and in 6 months when Joe is 50 his BMI will put him over the line into obesity.

Joe rarely sees his doctor. In winter he occasionally gets a chesty cough and makes an emergency appointment with any doctor who is available because Bridgette says he might need an antibiotic. Once or twice since his thirties, a doctor checked his blood pressure and it is always normal. He had a medical as part of his mortgage application when he was 35 and everything was ‘normal’. Most of Joe’s friends are heavier than Joe and he still thinks of himself as ‘healthy’.  After all, he walks to work, has a healthy banana as a snack in the afternoon and he makes sure his evening meal is a healthy one.

Joe doesn’t see any problem. There is really time to talk to the doctor about why he likes that large cup of coffee and the muffin or to say that he is stuck in a dead-end job with a mortgage to pay and children to raise. Joe doesn’t admit that he is bored. The coffee break is the highlight of an otherwise long day of drudgery.  Joe’s trousers are getting a little bit tighter. Bridgette has noticed but his friends are all so much bigger and Joe doesn’t think she’s worried about it. She herself has gone up three dress sizes since the children were born so she doesn’t tease him too much. Besides, he just got a bigger size recently and he still thinks he looks good.

Joe is at risk of becoming a statistic in the epidemic of Globesity. All that stands in the way is the ingenuity and interest of those who care to find a way to help Joe turn things around.

Picture by Khuroshvili Ilya

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