The future of healthcareLearn More

‘Dear Patient’, You Matter To Us.

Research reveals that a US civilian is expected to spend 72.35 years in the community, 59.5 days in short-stay hospitals, and 2.28 years in nursing homes throughout his or her lifetime. The probability of receiving care from a primary care physician is 100%.  It is conceivable that an individual may never need specialist services but it is inconceivable that an individual will never need to attend a primary care practitioner.

It is therefore a priority to ensure that the impact of contact with primary care practitioners is optimised. Two recent studies meet the criteria for lean innovations- low cost, agile, intuitive and creative solutions to common problems. The first of these was published in the British Journal of General Practice . The authors set out to increase the attendance rate for adolescents to general practitioners. Simply writing to young people as they reached the age of 16, assuring them of their privacy was enough to boost attendance rates. The results were remarkable. The authors, Aarseth et al conclude:

The proportion of adolescents in contact with a GP increased from 59% in the control group to 69% in the intervention group (P<0.001). For the males, the increase was from 54% to 72% (P<0.001). An information letter about health problems and health rights (such as the protection of the adolescent’s privacy) seems to enhance the accessibility and utilisation of GPs, as measured by contact rate, particularly for males.

The second study, also involved writing to patients and was published as part of a PhD thesis.

The project ’10 Small Steps’ encompasses the development and evaluation of a general practice based RCT designed to improve ten lifestyle behaviours known to be associated with chronic diseases. The low-intensity intervention involved providing computer-tailored feedback, based on a health behaviour summary score, to more than 4500 adult patients recruited through 21 general practitioners in Brisbane, Australia. Participants were followed-up at 3 and 12 months. The intervention was effective in improving the health behaviour score. These findings demonstrate the potential for a low-intensity intervention to improve the adoption and maintenance of health behaviours in a primary care population and for general practice as a conduit for the primary prevention of non-communicable diseases.

These studies exemplify the scope for significant health gains through low cost interventions developed, administered and evaluated in primary care.

Speak Your Mind

*