Common sense vs. miracle cures

I’ve seen this person, or someone like her many times before. On that occasion it was a demand for phentermine but it could have been antibiotics, ‘blood tests’, a ‘whole body scan’, benzodiazepines or opiates .

My doctor has prescribed it before. I need it again. So I just need a repeat script.

At a guess she had a BMI just shy of 30 and I noted that she had been prescribed this drug intermittently for a couple of years. She made it clear there was no room for discussion or argument. She had taken the day off work and wanted to get her diet underway. She wasn’t really interested in my opinion. If I’d prescribe it she’d leave. I explained politely that I don’t prescribe this drug (even though I could). I don’t believe it works and could actually harm her. But she persisted:

My professor prescribes it for me

In other words

What do you know about it? You’re ‘only’ a doctor.

I could explain lots of reasons why she shouldn’t be taking this drug. Phentermine is an amphetamine derivative that is used as an anti obesity agent it was approved by the US FDA in 1959 for short term treatment of obesity. It is the most commonly used anti-obesity drug on the US market and many US bariatric physicians use phentermine long term, ignoring the FDA guidelines that it be used for three months or less.

In a trial published in the British Medical Journal in 1968 it was concluded that phentermine has an anorectic effect ‘compared to placebo’. However according to a systematic review published in 2014:

No obesity medication has been shown to reduce cardiovascular morbidity or mortality. Additional studies are needed to determine the long-term health effects of obesity medications in large and diverse patient populations. JAMA

Like so many miracle cures discovered or unveiled decades ago we now know a bit more. Phentermine has been associated with psychosis. But there is precious little else to indicate major problems in the literature and the drug is still listed as available to prescribe. However patient experience is another matter:

I lost about 20 kg’s on [Phentermine] over about 6 months. I didn’t have any of the shaky or jittery, but these are common side effects. Even though my appetite was much less then it normally would be, I made a conscious effort to eat three small meals a day and a few snacks. I Used it in conjunction with a calorie tracker plus exercised. It can make the weight drop off quickly but if you don’t make the steps to eat correctly and exercise you can pick it up weight plus some again when you stop taking the tablets. Glowworm80

And another:

However, there are side effects. Lots of people say it makes their heart feel “racy”. This has not happened to me, but I suffered terrible insomnia. I wasn’t able to sleep before 3am in the morning, just lying in bed with thoughts racing around a million miles an hour. But then when you get up and take the next day’s pill, you get energised and you don’t feel like you’ve only had three hours sleep.

You can see how ridiculous this all is … eating next to nothing, sleeping only three hours a night but feeling no hunger and having boudless energy. It is not something that your body will thank you for in the long run. peckingbird

And this one:

I am sorry to say but I think any doctor who prescribes [Phentermine] as a first choice treatment for weight issues is being negligent. I really do understand the attraction when weight is needed to be lost quickly BUT..

I know many people who’ve taken it ( it was very readily available back in the 90s ) they have lost varying amounts of weight and have had varying side effects…some really dangerous and not one of them has maintained their weight loss beyond a couple of months after ceasing the drug. Soontobegran

This has also been my experience when I’ve prescribed it for patients in the past so I won’t prescribe it now. We need to exercise our right to refuse to prescribe treatments that promise more than they can deliver because they rarely do. We don’t need to wait for research evidence to catch up with common sense.

With regard to ‘diet pills’ I agree with this:

The allure of a pill – whether pharmaceutical or nutraceutical – that allows one to lose weight without requiring behavioural changes at the dinner table or in the gym is irresistible. a burgeoning market for both prescription and over-the-counter diet pills exists. Unfortunately to date, the dream of a thin-pill has largely failed to materialise due to unrealised efficacy, safety or both. Mark K Huntington & Roger A Shewmake

Picture by Baker County Tourism

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