Address the patient’s greatest fears ASAP

5418964298_f559aa973b_z

I think my son has meningitis.

I glanced at the boy who was now walking across the room to look more closely at a poster on antenatal care.

I don’t think so was my first thought, followed by thank you for telling me exactly what you are worried about. It’s not always that easy. Often the ‘hidden agenda’ remains just that- hidden. The longer it remains unchallenged the greater its hold. Then it’s much less easily to address head on. Sometimes you get a sense of it from the smell of fear as it comes into the room. Occasionally it’s hidden in a request for curious tests:

Could you check my vitamin levels?

My favorite is those who come for ‘check ups’ and are seemingly asymptomatic. I recommend the paper by¬†Sabina Hunziker and colleagues. They studied 66 cases of people who explicitly requested a ‘check up’. All consults were video recorded and¬†analysed for information about spontaneously mentioned symptoms and reasons for the clinic consultation (“open agendas”) and for clues to hidden patient agendas using the Roter interaction analysis system (RIAS).In RIAS, a cue denotes an element in patient-provider communications that is not explicitly expressed verbally. It includes vague indications of emotions such as anxiety or embarrassment that patients might find difficult to express openly and that prevent the patient from being completely forthcoming about his or her reasons for requesting a consultation. All 66 patients initially declared to be asymptomatic but this was ultimately the case in only 7 out of 66 patients.

Back to the boy with ‘meningitis’. He had a fever and aches and pains. However according to Dr. Google, who mum consulted just before rushing to the surgery, if the child had ‘cold hands’ one of the possibilities is that the child has meningitis.

I examined the child thoroughly and found that he had a mild pyrexia and signs of an upper respiratory tract infection. He was awake, alert and clearly interested in his surroundings. He was persuaded to smile and had no signs of septicemia. As this is a common fear in anxious parents I am prepared with standard advice that might be helpful and outline the way meningitis presents. Something I have encountered in practice.

There are many other fears that are presented in an urgent consult. In 99.99% of cases, they are unfounded. However the opportunity to allay the patient’s fears is also an opportunity to forge a bond that may be of enormous assistance when those fears prove to be well-founded. It may be worth considering how you will respond to patient fears of the many monsters that appear in the dead of night; cancer, heart attack, Kawasaki’s disease and meningitis in particular. Bearing in mind these monsters do occasionally present in the most atypical fashion.

Picture by Pimthida

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *