The future of healthcareLearn More

Doctors need better tools to help people recognise danger

Doctors see it all the time. The fifty-year-old with a BMI of 28, the teenager who is developing a taste for cigarettes, the twenty-year-old who now binge drinks every weekend, the soon-to-be-mum who is ‘eating for two’. Small choices that may become habits and habits that lead to consequences. Where I have worked the average consultation lasts fifteen minutes. In that time we address whatever symptoms or problems have been tabled. The list may be long. Occasionally it’s possible during the conversation to bring up a subject that I’m worried about. The problem is the patient may not be worried about that issue.

Afterall doctor I don’t drink any more than my mates do or I don’t really eat that much.

What’s needed are tools that help frame the issue from the perspective of the patient, not the practitioner. Tools that help us address public health priorities that speak TO that person, not AT everyone. Before making any changes the person needs to agree that their choices might blight their hopes for the future. These are not inconsiderable challenges given the gloomy predictions for the future.

At the other end of the malnutrition scale, obesity is one of today’s most blatantly visible – yet most neglected – public health problems. Paradoxically coexisting with undernutrition, an escalating global epidemic of overweight and obesity – “globesity” – is taking over many parts of the world. If immediate action is not taken, millions will suffer from an array of serious health disorders. The World Health Organisation

Diabetes is likely to cement its place as the fastest growing epidemic in history. The Medical Journal of Australia

In addition, youthful drinking is associated with an increased likelihood of developing alcohol abuse or dependence later in life. Early intervention is essential to prevent the development of serious alcohol problems among youth between the ages of 12 and 20. NIH

Picture by Marcelo Nava

A small act that never goes unnoticed

Much can be said about the way we greet people. However nothing is more telling than the memory of the last time we were greeted when we were in need. Those who have travelled overseas know exactly what it's like to be in an alien environment, where … [Read more]

Are we are obstructing the doctor with gadgets?

Despite billions of dollars of investment in technology the results in healthcare are disappointing. Information Technology (IT) surrounds us every day. IT products and services from smart phones and search engines to online banking and stock … [Read more]

Doctors get to choose so much of what matters

You choose what you wear. They own the building, they chose the furniture, they employed the staff, they chose the wallpaper, they decided the policies, they set the opening hours. But whoever 'they' are there are only two people in the consultation. … [Read more]

Much of what’s wrong with healthcare is in the consulting room

It's not that complicated. Not really. So where do you look for pathology? Inspection, palpation, percussion and auscultation. How does it look, how does it feel, how does it sound and what do you hear when you know where to listen closely. I'm … [Read more]

We don’t have to agree but it doesn’t have to end in tears

I told him NO. You don't need antibiotics you have a virus. Now leave. This is the rather macho way in which the story of how a patient's 'unreasonable' request was rejected is sometimes recounted. In some cases the law was changed to allow people … [Read more]

The welcome rise of alternative providers

Two weeks ago an 80-year-old waited without food or drink for 14 hours in a Dublin city emergency department having fallen in her local supermarket. She was black and blue from head to toe a response to the call of gravity when she was launched off a … [Read more]

No plan, no progress it’s a simple equation in healthcare

Every business manager can lay her hands on plans and policies and can probably recite the 'vision statement'. I like the one for Lexmark printers because I think it works for healthcare clinics: Customers for life. To earn our customers' loyalty we … [Read more]

The country needs general practice to be the provider of choice

Ever since I came to Australia as a foreign graduate I have been obliged to work in a so-called 'area of need'. Directly opposite one practice in such a location, there is a large shopping centre. I sometimes go across the road to get my lunch. I … [Read more]

It’s time to consider what we want beyond access to general practitioners

Ever since Adam was a boy the thing that has driven policymakers into a frenzy is 'access' to a GP. That's good because they recognise that the work done by a general practitioner is very important. However, it sometimes feels like 'access' is the … [Read more]